The White House took the rare step of naming more than a dozen Democrats it worked “in close consultation” with ahead of a Wednesday announcement about changes to the Affordable Care Act.

All of the Democrats the administration cited are up for reelection in 2014, and most are either vulnerable, or find themselves early targets by the GOP for their past support of ObamaCare.

The administration announced Wednesday it would allow insurers to continue offering health plans that do not meet ObamaCare’s minimum coverage requirements. 

Prolonging the “keep your plan” fix to accommodate for President Obama’s broken promise about the law will avoid another wave of health policy cancellations otherwise expected in critical weeks before Election Day in 2014. 

The administration’s announcement of the delay singled out 13 Democrats that helped craft that change. 

The officials said Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerOvernight Tech: What we learned from Zuckerberg's media blitz | Opening arguments in AT&T-Time Warner trial | Trump plans new tariffs on China Overnight Cybersecurity: House Intel votes to release Russia report | House lawmakers demand Zuckerberg testify | Senators unveil updated election cyber bill Dems urge Trump to appoint science adviser MORE (D-Va.), Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible MORE (D-La.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSenate sides with Trump on providing Saudi military support Companies fretting over ‘foreign agents’ label Senators demand cyber deterrence strategy from Trump MORE (D-N.H.), and Mark UdallMark Emery UdallSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Democratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups MORE (D-Co.) consulted with the administration on the matter. 

Warner faces a challenge from former RNC Chairman Ed Gillespie in Virginia, while Landrieu, who has consistently been a vocal critic of the botched rollout, is seeking reelection in deep-red Louisiana. 

Analysts had pegged Udall as vulnerable in Colorado, but Republicans early in the year had failed to settle on a viable challenger. That changed last week, when Rep. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerSen. Gardner won’t let Jeff Sessions tread on Colorado’s cannabis boom Trump presses GOP to change Senate rules Republicans insist tax law will help in midterms MORE (R-Co.) announced he’d be entering the race.

A similar story is playing out in New Hampshire, where Shaheen might find herself up against former Sen. Scott Brown (R-Mass.). 

Republicans have vowed to make ObamaCare the primary issue in the 2014 election cycle, and have already begun hammering Landrieu and Warner over their support of the law, as well as other vulnerable Senate Democrats like Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina MORE (N.C.), and Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska). 

And on the House side, the administration said Reps. Tim BishopTimothy (Tim) Howard BishopDems separated by 29 votes in NY House primary Flint residents hire first K Street firm House moves to vote on .1T package; backup plan in place MORE (D-N.Y.), Elizabeth Esty (D-Conn.), Carol Shea-Porter (D-N.H.), Scott Peters (D-Calif.), Ann Kuster (D-N.H.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickGold Star father attacked by Trump steps up role in Dem primaries House Dems highlight promising new candidates Vulnerable House incumbents build up war chests MORE (D-Ariz.) and Ron BarberRonald (Ron) Sylvester BarberPrinciples and actions mean more than Jeff Flake’s words Giffords to lawmakers avoiding town halls: 'Have some courage' Ten House seats Dems hope Trump will tilt MORE (D-Ariz.) provided input, as did Rep. Gary Peters (D-Mich.), who's running for Senate. 

Bishop, Esty, Scott Peters, Kuster, Sinema and Barber are among members of the new Democratic coalition that arrived in 2012, and are seeking to hold on through what’s expected to be a difficult environment for Democratic incumbents in 2014.

Of that group, only Bishop and Kirkpatrick didn't join Republicans in a Wednesday vote to delay the individual mandate, which the White House had already said it would veto. Esty didn't vote - she was in her home district of New Britain, Conn., where President Obama was delivering a speech about raising the minimum wage.

And Gary Peters is the target of the Koch Brothers in Michigan, whose group Americans for Prosperity (AFP) has slammed him in ads for questioning the testimony of a woman in and AFP ad who claims she suffers from cancer and has been adversely affected by the law.

In a conference call with reporters on Wednesday, a senior administration official said he could “understand why some folks could look at” the changes as being politically motivated, but insisted they were not made with an eye for boosting Democrats in the 2014 midterm elections.

“The motivation here is really to implement the law in the way it should be implemented,” the official said. “This is the right way to do it, I feel like we’re doing this the right way for the right reasons.”

The official said the administration made itself  “available to both parties,” but that Republicans, in the House particularly, are more interested in repealing the law, rather than helping to fix it. 

That point might be a ray of hope for Democrats in 2014 – polls show the public would rather Congress work to fix ObamaCare, rather than scrap it entirely.