Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee are leading a pack of Republicans in Iowa for the GOP presidential nomination in 2016, according to a new poll. 

The survey by GOP firm Vox Populi released Tuesday shows 18 percent of active GOP voters in the early caucus state would vote for Bush, narrowly edging out Huckabee with 15 percent. 

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Huckabee and Bush have been near the top of a tight pack of potential GOP candidates for the last few months in Iowa, according to similar polling. 

Four other potential GOP presidential candidates also score double digits: Wisconsin Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanDem: Ex-lawmaker tried to pin me to elevator door and kiss me Two months later: Puerto Rico doesn’t have power, education or economy running again On Capitol Hill, few name names on sexual harassment MORE (13 percent), Kentucky Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCongress must end American support for Saudi war in Yemen Black men get longer prison sentences than white men for same crimes: study Sarah Palin on sexual harassment: 'People know I'm probably packing' so they 'don't mess with me' MORE (12 percent), Florida Sen. Marco Rubio (11 percent), and Rick Santorum (10 percent).

Nine percent said they would vote for Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, while Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie are tied at the bottom with 6 percent. 

On the Democratic side, 65 percent said they would vote for Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonO’Malley tells Dems not to fear Trump FBI informant gathered years of evidence on Russian push for US nuclear fuel deals, including Uranium One, memos show Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE, who has dominated early polling and started a tour to promote her new book Tuesday. Eighteen percent would choose Vice President Biden, while 12 percent prefer Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenCordray's legacy of consumer protection worth defending Booker tries to find the right lane  Jones raised 0K a day after first Moore accusers came forward: report MORE (Mass.). 

The poll surveyed 667 active voters from June 4-5 and has a margin of error of 3.8 percent.