Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) on Tuesday decried Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJustice to provide access to Comey memos to GOP lawmakers Justice Dept inspector asks US attorney to consider criminal charges for McCabe: reports 'Homeland' to drop Trump allegories in next season MORE as embodying an "old, tired" approach to government. 

ADVERTISEMENT
"I think the biggest loser a week ago was Hillary Clinton," Walker, a possible Republican presidential contender in 2016, said on Fox News.

"She embodies Washington. She embodies that old, tired top-down approach from the government. I think in the states as governors, we offer a much better alternative and I think there's a number of us who would be good prospects out there."

Clinton is the odds-on favorite to win the Democratic nomination for president in 2016 if she chooses to run, and Walker greatly enhanced his chances for a White House bid last week when he won reelection.

"Not only do I care about this great state, I care about this country," Walker said, echoing a line from his appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday. 

Walker joins other Republican possible presidential contenders, including Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHeitkamp becomes first Dem to back Pompeo for secretary of State Senate committee sets Monday vote even as Pompeo appears to lack support Trump checkmates Democrats in sending Pompeo to North Korea MORE (Ky.) and Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanFreedomWorks backs Jim Jordan for House Speaker House, Senate GOP compete for cash Some doubt McCarthy or Scalise will ever lead House GOP MORE (Wis.) in linking Clinton to Democratic losses on Tuesday. 

After previously signalling he needed more financial support in his race, Walker also played down any feud with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, the chairman of the Republican Governors Association (RGA), and a possible presidential rival.

"In the end, Chris and I are good friends," Walker said. "He came in a week out and campaigned with me. The RGA played strong in my race. The difference was there's just a lot more money than anybody ever expected from the unions."