A day after being selected to lead Republicans' 2016 Senate campaign, Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerTrump, GOP make peace after tax win — but will it last? Bipartisan senators: Americans need more security info for internet-connected devices Overnight Defense: House GOP going with plan to include full year of defense spending | American held as enemy combatant also a Saudi citizen | Navy adding oxygen monitors to training jets after issues MORE (R-Miss.) said Friday that Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems search for winning playbook Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response The Memo: Immigration battle tests activists’ muscle MORE (D-Nev,) "may decide to retire" instead of facing the tough campaign the GOP plans to bring against him.

The new National Republican Senatorial Committee chairman pointed out that Nevada's Republican governor, Brian Sandoval, who was just reelected overwhelmingly, could run against Reid in 2016.

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"To me, that state is going Republican," Wicker said on MSNBC. "I think Gov. Sandoval has a real good opportunity now after a great run as governor, perhaps to run for senator. So, you know, frankly I'll say this: I think Harry Reid may decide to retire. That's my prediction."

Reid won a tough race in 2010 against Republican Sharron Angle, whom Democrats were able to paint as extreme. 

Wicker was asked if Republicans would go after Reid with the same force that Democrats went after Republican leader, Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants NSA spying program overcomes key Senate hurdle Overnight Finance: Lawmakers see shutdown odds rising | Trump calls for looser rules for bank loans | Consumer bureau moves to revise payday lending rule | Trump warns China on trade deficit MORE (R-Ky.), this year.

"Well, absolutely," Wicker said. "But you know, more importantly, I think that the citizens of Nevada will go after Harry Reid. I think he's out of step with the state."

Republicans face a harder task in 2016 than this year, defending seats in bluer states. But Wicker expressed confidence in wins for Sens. Pat Toomey in Pennsylvania, Mark KirkMark KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE in Illinois and Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteLessons from Alabama: GOP, throw out the old playbook The Hill's 12:30 Report Explaining Democratic victories: It’s gun violence, stupid MORE in New Hampshire.

"You take them one by one, I think we can defend them," he said. 

He said Republicans would not be hobbled by crises, pointing to McConnell's assurances. 

"You know, they asked Mitch two ways about that, and the answer was the same: We're not going to have any government shutdowns; we're not going to have any threats of impeachment," Wicker said.