Five reasons Mary Landrieu lost
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Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuCNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' Trump posts O'Keefe videos on Instagram MORE’s (D-La.) luck ran out Saturday night. 

The Democrat’s colleagues talk about her as a fighter who has won tough runoff elections in red Louisiana before, even if she was the underdog against Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.). But in 2014, a host of factors conspired to keep her from ultimately falling short for a fourth term. 

 

Collapse among white voters 

Landrieu’s support among black voters in Louisiana is nearly universal, but strategists in the state wondered if there were enough of them to counteract Cassidy’s huge lead among white voters.

There were not. 

Landrieu’s percentage of the black vote was in the high 90s on Nov. 4, but Cassidy took more than 80 percent of the white vote.

Democrats, particularly those in the South, have suffered a complete collapse among white voters. Landrieu was the last white Democrat from the Deep South in the Senate, and none remain in the House.

Some have been critical of Democrats for abandoning the populist message that once resonated with blue-collar whites. That’s something they’ll have to fix if they hope to turn things around in 2016. 

Sen. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerTrump: Why aren't 'beleaguered AG,' investigators looking at Hillary Clinton? Trump: Washington ‘actually much worse than anyone ever thought’ Schumer: Dems didn't 'tell people what we stood for' in 2016 MORE (D-N.Y.) has started that conversation on the left, arguing that Democrats misallocated their resources passing the healthcare law when they had majorities in both chambers. They should have focused on the plights of the middle class after the economic meltdown, he argued.

 

Fail Marys

Landrieu steamrolled into the lame duck session intent on passing a bill authorizing the Keystone XL pipeline.

If it worked, it would put space between herself and an unpopular president, remind voters in the energy-rich state of her seniority on a key energy committee, and would be evidence she has the clout to pull together a Democratic coalition when it mattered most. 

She fell one vote shy in an embarrassing defeat, while a version of the bill sponsored by Cassidy sailed through the House.

“A Keystone bill did pass one chamber of Congress, that was the Cassidy bill,” Cassidy said at a debate last week. “Sen. Landrieu could not get that passed in the Senate.” 

Landrieu’s true last gasp was to call into question Cassidy’s character. In the final weeks of the race, she turned the entire focus of her campaign to allegations that Cassidy overbilled Louisiana State University.

“He’s going to be fighting more than President Obama,” Landrieu said at the debate. “If he gets elected, which I doubt, he will be fighting subpoenas because this is going to be under investigation.” 

But Cassidy called the allegations “absolutely false” and effectively beat them back. Strategists in the state say it was too late for the controversy to take hold anyway.

 

Assault on the airwaves

This one wasn’t even close. 

According to an analysis by the Center for Public Integrity, Republicans and outside conservative groups pummeled Landrieu on TV and the radio, while the Louisiana Democrat was effectively silenced during the runoff period. 

The numbers are staggering – ads from outside groups attacking Landrieu at one point accounted for about 13,900 of the 14,000 TV spots that ran since the Nov. 4 jungle primary. 

“I wish she had more air cover,” Sen. Joe DonnellyJoe DonnellyIndiana GOP rep: Likely primary opponent 'lying about my family' Dem senator to sell stock in family company that uses outsourced labor Vulnerable senators raise big money ahead of 2018 MORE (D-Ind.) told The Hill. “I was there [campaigning] because she’s my friend, but more importantly she’s done an extraordinary job for the people of Louisiana and you don’t abandon your friends when times get tough.”

It was a stark contrast from the run-up to the Nov. 4 election, when the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and other liberal groups bet big, running about 19,000 TV ads.

But the Nov. 4 elections left many political watchers doubtful that Landrieu could survive another tough contest in the face of a Republican wave, and with the Senate majority no longer at stake, national Democrats and liberal groups opted to sit on their money. 

Senate Democrats' campaign arm announced early in the runoff period it wouldn’t spend on the race. The DSCC took out a $10 million loan in October, but spent big on races it ultimately lost on Election Day.

“The DSCC had no money, so it wasn’t that they pulled it,” Sen. Bill NelsonBill NelsonGore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere Honda recalls 1.2 million cars over battery fires Vulnerable senators raise big money ahead of 2018 MORE (D-Fla.) told The Hill.

Senate Democrats interviewed by The Hill said they did what they could to help Landrieu with money, but the conservative outside groups smelled blood and went all in.

Landrieu’s campaign was also swamped by ads from the Cassidy campaign, which ran nearly 5,000 TV ads against Landrieu’s 3,000 during the runoff period. Cassidy had more spending flexibility by virtue of out-raising Landrieu by about $500,000 during the runoff.           

 

Cassidy rallied conservatives early

Cassidy recognized early on that he needed to target those Republicans who supported Tea Party candidate Rob Maness in the general election. Maness took 14 percent and likely kept Cassidy from winning the jungle primary outright.

Democrats argued that those conservatives would stay home for the Dec. 6 runoff, but Maness embraced his one-time rival early in the period, and a snowball effect of Republican support ensued. 

Conservatives like Family Research Council President Tony Perkins, former vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, and the Tea Party Express, who backed Maness in general election, became vocal proponents of Cassidy. Other Republicans who stayed out of the race during the general election, like Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulUnhappy senators complain about healthcare process Judd Gregg: For Trump, reaching out would pay off This week: ObamaCare repeal vote looms over Senate MORE (R-Ky.) and Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R), soon followed. 

Paul headlined the first “unity rally” in Louisiana for Cassidy about a week after Election Day, which caught on and became must-attend events for party heavyweights.

In addition to Paul, Palin and Jindal, Sen. David VitterDavid VitterOvernight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator Former senator who crafted chemicals law to lobby for chemicals industry MORE (R-La.), “Duck Dynasty”star Phil Robertson, Sen. John McCainJohn McCainMcCain returning to Senate in time for health vote Senate Dems launch talkathon ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote Overnight Healthcare: Trump pressures GOP ahead of vote | McConnell urges Senate to start debate | Cornyn floats conference on House, Senate bills | Thune sees progress on Medicaid MORE (R-Ariz.), and Dr. Ben Carson have all participated. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioMexican politicians have a new piñata: Donald Trump Bush ethics lawyer: Congress must tell Trump not to fire Mueller The private alternative to the National Flood Insurance Program  MORE (Fla.), Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Sen. Tim ScottTim ScottTrump squeezes 'no' vote Heller at healthcare lunch The Hill's 12:30 Report Guess who’s stumping for states' rights? MORE (S.C.) all participated.

Democrats began turning out for Landrieu on the campaign trail after the Keystone gambit, but strategists say by then all the energy in the campaign was on Cassidy’s side.

 

Doomed from the start 

The deck was deeply stacked against the Louisiana Democrat.

The midterm electorate is typically more favorable to Republicans, and voters were ready to take out their frustrations with President Obama on any Democrat that had the bad fortune of running in 2014.

The Republican wave earned the GOP their largest majority in the House in decades, and they easily picked up a convincing majority in the Senate.

Landrieu on Saturday joined her colleagues, Sens. Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (D-Alaska), Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (D-N.C.), Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark), and Mark UdallMark UdallDemocratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Gorsuch's critics, running out of arguments, falsely scream 'sexist' MORE (D-Colo.), as Democratic incumbents who were washed out in the wave.

If Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) runs for governor, and Landrieu has the appetite for another campaign, she may find more favorable political winds in 2016.