10 possible Senate retirements
© Greg Nash

Capitol Hill isn’t a happy or easy place to be these days, and several senators could be eyeing the exits ahead of 2016. 

While no official retirement statements have come out of the upper chamber yet, it’s safe to assume that many politicians are using the holidays to ponder their future. 

Here are 10 senators who could potentially step down after the 114th Congress.

Sen. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerBarbara Boxer recounts harassment on Capitol Hill: ‘The entire audience started laughing’ 100 years of the Blue Slip courtesy Four more lawmakers say they’ve been sexually harassed by colleagues in Congress MORE (D-Calif.)

Boxer’s fundraising efforts have lapsed, stoking speculation that the longtime liberal senator is ready to hang it up. 

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According to her latest Federal Election Commission filings, Boxer has less than $150,000 in her campaign account after a quarter in which her contributions fell short of $12,000. 

That’s in stark contrast to her fundraising efforts from the same quarter ahead of her successful 2010 reelection, when she raised $2.6 million and sat on more than $3.6 million.

Boxer, who is 74, told The Associated Press earlier this year that she’ll make an announcement in early 2015.

If she does retire, Democrats' deep bench of diverse potential candidates includes Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Kamala Harris, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. 

Sen. David VitterDavid VitterThe Senate 'ethics' committee is a black hole where allegations die Questions loom over Franken ethics probe You're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat MORE (R-La.)

Vitter announced earlier this year that he intends to run for governor of Louisiana in 2015 to succeed term-limited Gov. Bobby Jindal (R-La.). 

Since it’s a year before he’d be up for reelection in the Senate, if he wins, he could retire from the Senate and appoint an interim replacement to his seat in the upper chamber. If he loses the governor’s race, he could still run for reelection to the Senate in 2016.

Analysts say Vitter, who coasted to reelection in 2010 despite previously having admitted to being a client to the infamous “D.C. Madam,” is the overwhelming favorite to take the governor’s mansion in a state that has turned deep red in recent cycles. 

However, the Louisiana gubernatorial race is a jungle primary, so Vitter’s toughest challenge could come from another Republican. Strategists say Vitter would easily dispatch of any potential Democratic foes, but if none make it to the runoff, they say anything could happen between two Republicans going head to head. 

Rep. John FlemingJohn FlemingCoast Guard suspends search for missing Ohio plane Freedom Caucus member to bring up bill on impeaching IRS chief GOP seeks to make it 52 MORE (R-La.) has also expressed interest in the seat, and Rep. Charles BoustanyCharles William BoustanyTop Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns Controversial House Republican gains national attention after filming Auschwitz video Democrats, Republicans must work together to advance health care MORE Jr. (R-La.) has also been mentioned. Republicans in the state also have a deep bench of potential state-level candidates. 

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRyan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Richard Gere welcomes lawmakers' words of support for Tibet Dem lawmaker gives McConnell's tax reform op-ed a failing grade MORE (R-Fla.)

Rubio’s Senate career is at a crossroads.

He’s been laying the groundwork for a presidential run, but Florida state law prohibits him from running for the Senate and White House at the same time. Unlike Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLexington mayor launches bid for Congress Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Meet the Iran hawk who could be Trump's next secretary of State MORE (R-Ky.), who is seeking a work-around to the same conundrum in his home state, Rubio has said he won’t seek both. 

That means if Rubio takes the presidential plunge, he’ll have to retire from the Senate.

If that’s the path he takes, Florida would become an instant toss-up. Democrats are already eyeing two House members from red districts in the state — Rep. Patrick Murphy and incoming Rep. Gwen Graham — as potential challengers to Rubio or whoever the GOP puts forth to run for the Senate in 2016. 

Political watchers, meanwhile, have no idea whether Rubio will run for president. They believe he’s a rare political talent, but his mentor, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, is likely running for president, and the two share many of the same donors and supporters. 

Rubio has maintained Bush’s decision won’t factor into his own, but polls show that most Republicans right now would side with Bush over Rubio.

Still, Rubio is a popular rising star in the party, and he has options beyond 2016. He could run for governor to succeed Gov. Rick Scott (R) in 2018, and Florida’s other Senate seat, currently held by Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonOvernight Health Care: Ryan's office warns he wasn't part of ObamaCare deal | House conservatives push for mandate repeal in final tax bill | Dem wants probe into CVS-Aetna merger Ryan's office warning he wasn't part of deal on ObamaCare: source Overnight Health Care: Funding bill could provide help for children's health program | Questions for CVS-Aetna deal | Collins doubles funding ask for ObamaCare bill MORE (D-Fla.), will also be up for grabs that year. 

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinTrump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meeting Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank Wealthy outsiders threaten to shake up GOP Senate primaries MORE (D-W.Va.) 

Manchin, a centrist Democrat from a red state, has been vocal about his frustrations with gridlock on Capitol Hill and the leadership in his own party. 

That could have him eyeing a return to his old job as governor of West Virginia, a post he held from 2005 to 2010.

“There is definitely that consideration," he told The Register-Herald in November. "If I don't see the opportunities to really help my country and my state, and things just stay the same and we continue to hear the rhetoric, if it's the same-old same-old, it's not a place I'd desire to be.”

"If there is an opportunity in West Virginia and the people would want me to come back home, I would definitely consider that move," he added.

The Hill reported earlier this year that Manchin gave generously to state officials from his campaign account in 2014, potentially laying the groundwork for a return there.

Democrats would be hard pressed to hold Manchin’s seat should he leave Washington.

In 2016, it will have been 20 years since West Virginia voted for a Democratic presidential candidate, and Republican Sen.-elect Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoSenate women: Rules on harassment must change Congress, here's a CO2-smart tax fix to protect, create jobs Women, Dems leading sexual harassment discussion in Congress: analysis MORE crushed her Democratic opponent in 2014 by nearly 30 percentage points.

Sen. Harry ReidHarry ReidBill O'Reilly: Politics helped kill Kate Steinle, Zarate just pulled the trigger Tax reform is nightmare Déjà vu for Puerto Rico Ex-Obama and Reid staffers: McConnell would pretend to be busy to avoid meeting with Obama MORE (D-Nev.)

Reid has said he’s running for reelection and reports indicate he’s beginning to staff up, but would the 75-year-old outgoing Senate majority leader stand in for another fight if he was a long shot?

In 2010, Reid survived the Tea Party wave in large part because of the disastrous candidacy of GOP nominee Sharron Angle. But in 2016, he’ll be a top target for Republicans.

Reid is underwater among Nevada voters, and if Gov. Brian Sandoval (R-Nev.) jumps in, the longtime Senate Democrat would become an instant underdog. 

Reid, who has more than $1.5 million in cash on hand, has experienced backlash from some centrists in his party who are ready for new leadership after November's losses.

Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsNational counterterrorism chief to retire at the end of year Former intel chief Hayden: Think twice on a Trump job offer Counterintelligence needs reboot for 21st century MORE (R-Ind.)

Coats has retired once before, spending more than a decade outside of Washington before returning for a third term in 2010. 

He’s expressed frustration with the gridlock in Congress, but earlier this year, he told The Elkhart Truth that a Republican majority would factor into his decision to run for reelection.

Republicans took the Senate in 2014, but that majority could be short-lived. Coats presently has less than $800,000 in his campaign account.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat Meghan McCain knocks Bannon: 'Who the hell are you' to criticize Romney? Dems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress MORE (R-Ariz.) 

The 2008 GOP presidential nominee has openly mulled retiring when his term ends in 2016. 

“The president and I, he's in his last term, I'm probably in mine, the relationship we have had over the past three years is quite good,” he told The Wrap in an interview last year, adding that he didn’t want to be “one of these old guys that should’ve shoved off.”

He’s since changed his tune, telling The Arizona Republic that he’s “seriously considering” and “leaning towards" running for reelection.

Still, the 78-year-old knows what kind of challenges lie ahead. He’s acknowledged that he’ll likely get a primary challenger from the right, and if that’s not something the no-nonsense five-term senator wants to deal with, he could shove off sooner rather than later.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Thanks to the farm lobby, the US is stuck with a broken ethanol policy MORE (R-Iowa)

Grassley told a public TV station in Iowa earlier this year that he intends to run for reelection in 2016. He said that with Sen. Tom HarkinTom HarkinDemocrats are all talk when it comes to DC statehood The Hill's 12:30 Report Distance education: Tumultuous today and yesterday MORE (D-Iowa) retiring at the end of the year, he didn’t want to leave the Hawkeye State with two junior senators. 

Still, Grassley would be pushing 90 by the end of his next term, but he proved in 2014 he can still handle the rigors of the campaign trail. He crossed the state on behalf of Republican candidates, and he’s an avid runner to boot. The Republican has more than $1.7 million in his campaign account. 

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyAvalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign America isn't ready to let Sessions off his leash Your tax dollars fund Afghan child rape MORE (D-Vt.)

Leahy told reporters at the end of 2013 that the government shutdown convinced him that he needed to run again to ensure that there are enough “grown ups” in Washington to run things.

But at 74 years old and with four decades in Congress behind him, he’s among the most senior members in the upper chamber. He’ll also be losing his chairmanship on the Senate Judiciary Committee when Republicans take over in January.

If he did step aside, his seat would likely be a safe one for Democrats in liberal Vermont. 

Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiClinton: White House slow-walking Russia sanctions Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns Gore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere MORE (D-Md.) 

Mikulski, 78, will also be losing a gavel this year.

However, the first woman to chair the Senate Appropriations Committee appears committed to seeking a fifth term. 

She has sought to rally Democrats in Maryland after the party suffered a devastating loss in the race for the governor’s mansion. She is also looking to appoint a party “loyalist” to ease her transition into the 2016 election cycle.

She has less than $900,000 in cash on hand.