Democratic presidential candidate Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonO’Malley tells Dems not to fear Trump FBI informant gathered years of evidence on Russian push for US nuclear fuel deals, including Uranium One, memos show Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE on Thursday said "deep-seated … religious beliefs" have to be changed before the world's women will get full access to abortion.

“Far too many women are still denied critical access to reproductive health care and safe childbirth. All the laws we've passed don’t count for much if they’re not enforced,” Clinton said.

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“Rights have to exist in practice — not just on paper,” Clinton argued. “Laws have to be backed up with resources and political will."

“And deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs and structural biases have to be changed,” Clinton added.

Clinton’s remarks came during the sixth annual Women in The World Summit in New York. She also called on world leaders to speed up progress on women’s rights across the globe.
 
“As I have said and as I believe, the advancement of the full participation of women and girls in every aspect of their societies is the great unfinished business of the 21st century,” Clinton claimed.
 
“Not just for women but for everyone,” she added. “And not just in far away countries but right here in the United States.”
 
Clinton additionally tied the struggle for feminine equality to amnesty for illegal immigrants. She hinted that her GOP foes next election cycle did not understand the implications of their stance opposing amnesty.
 
“There are those who offer themselves as leaders who would deport mothers working to give their children a better life, rather than risk the ire of talk radio,” Clinton said.

Clinton is thus far the only declared presidential option for Democratic voters in 2016. She came under fire on Thursday amid allegations the Clinton Foundation accepted donations from foreign entities in exchange for political favors from State during her tenure.
 
Author Peter Schweizer raised questions about the donations in his upcoming book, Clinton Cash, due out May 5.

— This story was updated at 12:59 p.m.