Rubio: 'I would rather lose an election' than be wrong about abortion

Marco RubioMarco RubioRubio: GOP Congress could go in different direction than Trump Poll: Clinton holds 4-point lead in Florida Republicans, it's time to stop asking 'What would Reagan do?' MORE is defending his controversial stance on abortion, saying he would rather lose votes than bend on what he sees as an important moral issue.

"I want to be frank," the Florida senator told the New Hampshire audience at Saturday night's Republican debate. "I would rather lose an election than be wrong on the issue of life."

Rubio was questioned about whether his hardline opposition to abortion — he believes there should not be exceptions for rape or incest, only to save the life of the mother — could appeal to millennials. Other pro-life Republicans on stage, including Jeb Bush and Chris Christie, believe abortions should be allowed when a woman has been raped or is the victim of incest and have gone after Rubio on the issue.

The Clinton campaign is preparing to paint Rubio as an extremist on abortion and will likely use it as one of their main attacks against him should he be the Republican nominee.

But Rubio said he would be the one making abortion a general election issue. He replied that he found it outrageous that the media had not grilled the Democrats during their debates over their "extremist" positions.

"On abortion the Democrats are extremists," Rubio said. "Why doesn't the media ask Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonTrump to lay out first 100 days in Gettysburg speech GOP senator: Dems making ‘concerted effort to produce fraudulent votes’ Trump touts Navy expansion proposal in Pa. MORE why she believes that all abortions should be legal, even on the due date of that unborn child?

"Why don't they ask Hillary Clinton why she believes that partial birth abortion, which is a gruesome procedure ... she thinks that's a fundamental right," Rubio added.

"They are the extremists when it comes to the issue of abortion and I can't wait to expose them in a general election."