Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN analyst Kirsten Powers: Melania's jacket should read 'Let them eat cake' CNN's Cuomo confronts Lewandowski over 'womp womp' remark Sessions says FBI agent Peter Strzok no longer has his security clearance MORE holds a commanding lead over his Republican presidential rivals in his home state of New York but would lose the state in a general election, according to a new poll.

Trump holds a 52-point lead over Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Gang of Four to meet next week on immigration Live coverage: High drama as hardline immigration bill fails, compromise vote delayed Trump renews call to end filibuster amid immigration furor MORE, 64 to 12 percent, in the Emerson College poll of likely GOP primary voters in New York, which also shows John Kasich at 1 percent.

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But Trump would lose to both Democratic candidates in the state in hypothetical matchups: Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSessions says FBI agent Peter Strzok no longer has his security clearance Melania Trump puzzles with 'I really don't care' jacket Grassley wants to subpoena Comey, Lynch after critical IG report MORE leads him by 19 points, 55 to 36 percent, and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBernie Sanders: Trump thinks like an authoritarian Democrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor Trump's America fights back MORE leads him by 17 points, 53 to 36 percent.

Cruz, who's running second to Trump in the GOP race, would similarly face unfriendly terrain in New York, losing by 31 points to Clinton, a former senator of the state whose campaign is based in Brooklyn.

Clinton, who was twice elected as a New York senator, locked up wins in five more states on Tuesday, extending her delegate lead. She's favored by 48 points over Sanders, 71 percent to 23 percent, to win the New York primary on April 19, according to the Emerson poll.

The survey of 768 likely general election voters in New York, which traditionally favors Democrats, was conducted March 14–16 via landlines with a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

The survey of 298 likely GOP primary voters has a margin of error of 5.6 points, while the survey of 373 likely Democratic primary voters has a margin of error of 5 points.