Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDems flip Wisconsin state Senate seat Sessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants GOP rep: 'Sheet metal and garbage' everywhere in Haiti MORE holds a commanding lead over his Republican presidential rivals in his home state of New York but would lose the state in a general election, according to a new poll.

Trump holds a 52-point lead over Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWith religious liberty memo, Trump made America free to be faithful again Interstate compacts aren't the right way to fix occupational licensing laws Texas Dem: ‘I don’t know what to believe’ about what Trump wants for wall MORE, 64 to 12 percent, in the Emerson College poll of likely GOP primary voters in New York, which also shows John Kasich at 1 percent.

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But Trump would lose to both Democratic candidates in the state in hypothetical matchups: Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIntel Dem decries White House 'gag order' after Bannon testimony 'Total free-for-all' as Bannon clashes with Intel members Mellman: On Political Authenticity (Part 2) MORE leads him by 19 points, 55 to 36 percent, and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersMellman: On Political Authenticity (Part 2) Former Sanders campaign manager: Don't expect email list to be shared with DNC Adult film star: Trump and Stormy Daniels invited me to 'hang out' MORE leads him by 17 points, 53 to 36 percent.

Cruz, who's running second to Trump in the GOP race, would similarly face unfriendly terrain in New York, losing by 31 points to Clinton, a former senator of the state whose campaign is based in Brooklyn.

Clinton, who was twice elected as a New York senator, locked up wins in five more states on Tuesday, extending her delegate lead. She's favored by 48 points over Sanders, 71 percent to 23 percent, to win the New York primary on April 19, according to the Emerson poll.

The survey of 768 likely general election voters in New York, which traditionally favors Democrats, was conducted March 14–16 via landlines with a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

The survey of 298 likely GOP primary voters has a margin of error of 5.6 points, while the survey of 373 likely Democratic primary voters has a margin of error of 5 points.