Donald TrumpDonald TrumpA very big deal to solve a very big problem Law professors file misconduct complaint against Conway: report State Dept. memo — on dangers of leaks — leaks to media MORE holds a commanding lead over his Republican presidential rivals in his home state of New York but would lose the state in a general election, according to a new poll.

Trump holds a 52-point lead over Ted CruzTed CruzConquering Trump returns to conservative summit The Hill's 12:30 Report Cruz predicts another Supreme Court vacancy this year MORE, 64 to 12 percent, in the Emerson College poll of likely GOP primary voters in New York, which also shows John Kasich at 1 percent.

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But Trump would lose to both Democratic candidates in the state in hypothetical matchups: Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonMichael Moore touts Ellison for DNC chair: ‘We need fresh blood’ Conquering Trump returns to conservative summit How the candidates for DNC chair stack up ahead of Saturday's vote MORE leads him by 19 points, 55 to 36 percent, and Bernie SandersBernie SandersMichael Moore touts Ellison for DNC chair: ‘We need fresh blood’ Tommy Chong: Trump pot crackdown 'will be defeated in court' DNC chair campaigns scramble ahead of tight vote MORE leads him by 17 points, 53 to 36 percent.

Cruz, who's running second to Trump in the GOP race, would similarly face unfriendly terrain in New York, losing by 31 points to Clinton, a former senator of the state whose campaign is based in Brooklyn.

Clinton, who was twice elected as a New York senator, locked up wins in five more states on Tuesday, extending her delegate lead. She's favored by 48 points over Sanders, 71 percent to 23 percent, to win the New York primary on April 19, according to the Emerson poll.

The survey of 768 likely general election voters in New York, which traditionally favors Democrats, was conducted March 14–16 via landlines with a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

The survey of 298 likely GOP primary voters has a margin of error of 5.6 points, while the survey of 373 likely Democratic primary voters has a margin of error of 5 points.