Sanders sees 'path toward victory' against Clinton
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Democratic presidental contender Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders dodges question on FBI investigation into his wife Major progressive group rolls out first incumbent House endorsement A bipartisan consensus against 'big pharma' is growing in Congress MORE says he has a "path toward victory" against front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonAmazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods underscores the threat posed by ‘big data’ Pro-Trump group blasts 'rigged' Russia probe in ad starring Tomi Lahren Trump believes Russia 'probably' behind election hacking MORE, dismissing claims that her lead is insurmountable.

“I don’t believe they have an insurmountable lead,” Sanders told The Associated Press in an interview Friday. “Secretary Clinton has done phenomenally well in the Deep South and in Florida. That’s where she has gotten the lion’s share of votes. And I congratulate her for that. But we’re out of the Deep South now.”

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Clinton's campaign has raised pressure on Sanders to drop out, arguing that she has built a commanding lead in the race. Clinton's communications director, Jennifer Palmieri, on Wednesday said Clinton had an "almost insurmountable" lead in pledged delegates. Clinton currently leads Sanders in total delegates, which includes unpledged supredelegates, 1,614 to 856.

Clinton won every state in Tuesday’s primaries, including swing states Ohio and Florida, leaving Sanders facing more questions about why he's in the race.

President Obama even told donors that it’s time to rally behind Clinton for the Democratic nomination, according to a New York Times report.

But Sanders insists he sees a way to clinch the nomination.

"We think from now on out, we are having states that, everything being equal, we stand a chance to do well in. We think we have a path toward victory," he said.

“We’ve got some big states coming up and we think if we can do well, if we go into the convention with delegates, we’ve got a shot at taking the nomination,” Sanders continued, predicting that contests in Arizona, Washington, Wisconsin, New York and Pennsylvania will help him catch up.