Everybody wanted a piece of Dave Brat’s stunning defeat of House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorEx-RNC spokesman: After Trump remarks how can I tell minorities to vote GOP Kelly’s challenge? Bringing stability to Trump White House Special interests hide behind vets on Independence Day MORE (R-Va.) on Wednesday.

Long-shot conservative primary challengers like Tennessee state Rep. Joe Carr, running against Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderTrump to make ObamaCare payments to insurers for August CBO: ObamaCare premiums could rise 20 percent if Trump ends payments CBO to release report Tuesday on ending ObamaCare insurer payments MORE (R-Tenn.), saw themselves in Brat and emerged with newfound optimism at their chances.

“Sen. Alexander has a similar problem that Leader Cantor had in that he's out of touch with his Republican base in Tennessee,” Carr said.

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Radiologist Milton Wolf, challenging Sen. Pat RobertsPat RobertsNo. 2 Senate Republican backs McConnell in Trump fight Overnight Healthcare: McConnell warns Senate not to block repeal debate | Insurers knock Cruz proposal | WH tries to discredit CBO | Lawmakers propose .1B NIH funding boost Trump: I’ll be ‘very angry’ if Senate doesn’t pass ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (R-Kan.), hit the same notes.

Even New Hampshire GOP Senate candidate Scott Brown read the tea leaves of Brat’s win in his favor. His campaign manager, Colin Reed, penned a five-point memo outlining why Brat’s win was bad news for Sen. Jeanne Shaheen Jeanne ShaheenSavings through success in foreign assistance Overnight Cybersecurity: Mueller impanels grand jury in Russia probe | Researcher who helped stop WannaCry attack detained | Audit finds OPM systems still at risk Senators advance bill to train small business counselors in cybersecurity MORE (D-N.H.), arguing it portends an anti-incumbent sentiment and grassroots strength.

Democrats, too, got in on the spin, tying vulnerable Republicans in districts with big Hispanic populations to Brat and arguing his anti-immigration reform stance reflected the whole of the GOP, like Rep. David Valadao's (R-Calif.) Democratic challenger, Amanda Renteria, put it.

“Congressman David Valadao’s Republican party proved tonight they’d rather play to their base than get serious about passing commonsense immigration reform,” she said.

And in Mississippi, GOP Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranGOP senators ask Trump to hold off on Venezuelan oil sanctions Both sides of the aisle agree — telemedicine is the future Overnight Finance: GOP offers measure to repeal arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for Russian sanctions violations | Senate panel sticks with 2017 funding levels for budget | Trump tax nominee advances | Trump unveils first reg agenda MORE’s primary challenger, state Sen. Chris McDaniel, even took partial credit for the win. 

In a fundraising email to supporters on Tuesday night, McDaniel declared: “We just beat Eric Cantor.”


CANTOR

Lawmakers and voters alike are trying to make sense of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s (R-Va.) shocking primary loss Tuesday night. Many attribute the loss to his openness to immigration reform, with Cantor-slayer Dave Brat himself calling immigration the “clear differentiator” between the two candidates on MSNBC this morning. Potential presidential contender Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonAssange meets U.S. congressman, vows to prove Russia did not leak him documents High-ranking FBI official leaves Russia probe OPINION | Steve Bannon is Trump's indispensable man — don't sacrifice him to the critics MORE slammed him for "basically [running] against immigrants" on Wednesday.

Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulCurtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz Glimmer of hope in bipartisan criminal justice reform effort Trump barrage stuns McConnell and his allies MORE (R-Ky.), however, suggested Cantor's negative ads backfired on him. GOP pollsters also discouraged the connection between Cantor’s loss and the fate of immigration reform, pressing Republicans to instead look to Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamGraham: Trump's Charlottesville rhetoric 'dividing Americans, not healing them' OPINION: Congress should censure Trump for his unfit conduct Supporting 'Dreamers' is our civic and moral duty MORE’s (R-S.C.) primary success.

Among the lawmakers celebrating Cantor’s loss was Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzThe media couldn't be more blatant in distorting Trump's words on Charlottesville Curtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz Kimmel: Let’s make Trump a king so he has no power MORE (R-Texas), who cited the primary upset as an indication that the “conservative base is alive and well.” Cruz urged Republican Party leaders to view the incident as a warning, and said he looks forward to working with Brat in Congress. 


SENATE SHOWDOWN

SC-SEN (GRAHAM): Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) persevered in his primary election, winning the race by 40 points. However, Smart Politics reports that Graham took the lowest share of the primary vote of any sitting U.S. senator in a Republican primary — in part due to the fact that he was facing six primary challengers. Compared to his South Carolina predecessors, Graham received the lowest support of any elected senator in either party since 1950.  

AR-SEN (PRYOR): Rep. Tom CottonTom CottonImmigration battlefield widens for Trump, GOP The RAISE Act reveals what Trump really thinks about immigrants How Trump's legal immigration cuts could be a blessing to Dreamers MORE (R-Ark.) released a new ad slamming opponent Sen. Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.) for “toeing the line,” accusing him of blindly voting with his party and with President Obama. In the ad, Cotton insists he would show backbone in office, standing up to his own party if necessary. 

A GOP poll conducted for an outside group backing Cotton by Tony Fabrizio & Associates found Cotton with a 51 percent to 43 percent lead.

KY-SEN (MCCONNELL): Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellTrump’s isolation grows Ellison: Trump has 'level of sympathy' for neo-Nazis, white supremacists Trump touts endorsement of second-place finisher in Alabama primary MORE’s (R-Ky.) Democratic opponent, Alison Lundergan Grimes, is again getting Hollywood help, this time with a June 23 fundraiser hosted by Dreamworks CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg and Hollywood mega-producer Harvey Weinstein.

NH-SEN (SHAHEEN), IA-SEN (OPEN): Americans for Prosperity, the GOP group backed by billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch, launched a $1 million ad campaign against Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) and Rep. Bruce BraleyBruce BraleyTen years later, House Dems reunite and look forward Trump: Ernst wanted 'more seasoning' before entertaining VP offer Criminal sentencing bill tests McConnell-Grassley relationship MORE (D-Iowa) on Wednesday. The ad running against Shaheen criticizes her for backing ObamaCare, and the one airing in Iowa hits Braley for wavering on the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

Meanwhile, the New Hampshire Democratic Party launched a petition drive to get Republican Senate candidate Scott Brown to release his personal financial disclosure forms.

NC-SEN (HAGAN): Generation Opportunity, a GOP group geared toward young voters, launched its first ad of the cycle, accusing Sen. Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (D-N.C.) of passing policies that hurt young people. It features a young woman urging viewers to “Call Kay Hagan — tell her to stop spending our generation’s future,” and is backed by a $700,000 television buy and another $150,000 online.

ME-SEN (COLLINS): Maine Democratic Senate candidate Shenna Bellows launched her first television ad of the general election Wednesday, focusing on her working-class background and local roots. Bellows is running against incumbent Susan CollinsSusan CollinsOPINION: Congress should censure Trump for his unfit conduct No. 2 Senate Republican backs McConnell in Trump fight The fight to protect the Affordable Care Act isn’t over MORE (R-Maine). 

OK-SEN (OPEN): A group backing T.W. Shannon in the Oklahoma Senate Republican primary, Oklahomans for a Conservative Future, released a new survey showing him up over Rep. James Lankford (R-Okla.) by just 2 points, 39 percent to 37 percent of likely GOP primary voters. That’s a drop in support from the group’s last survey, conducted in April, which showed Shannon leading Lankford 42-32.

BATTLE FOR THE HOUSE

WV-03 (RAHALL): In a new campaign ad, Rep. Nick RahallNick RahallLikely W.Va. Senate GOP rivals spar in radio appearances West Virginia is no longer Clinton country Solution needed: Rail congestion is stifling economic growth MORE (D-W.Va.) touts his efforts to block the proposed Environmental Protection Agency rule limiting carbon emissions for power plants. Rahall emphasizes his support for the coal industry, a sentiment that he has focused on throughout his campaign. 

ME-02 (OPEN): Maine Democratic nominee Emily Cain earned a spot in the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s Red to Blue Program, which recognizes top Democratic candidates. Meanwhile Democratic groups were on offense on Wednesday trying to frame her opponent, former state Treasurer Bruce Poliquin, as a Tea Party shill.

AL-06 (OPEN): Club for Growth PAC endorsed Gary Palmer against state Rep. Paul DeMarco in the GOP primary runoff for Rep. Spencer BachusSpencer BachusBusiness pressure ramps up against Trump's Ex-Im nominee Trump considering withdrawing Ex-Im nominee: report Business groups silent on Trump's Ex-Im nominee MORE’s (R-Ala.) vacant seat, after initially endorsing a candidate that didn’t make it to the runoff.

NY-1 (BISHOP): In his newest ad, Republican Lee Zeldin touts his military service and accuses primary opponent George Demos of being bankrolled by “pro-abortion, anti-gun rights California liberals.”

NY-21 (OPEN): American Crossroads is going up with another ad in the GOP primary for retiring Rep. Bill Owens’s (D) seat, hitting him on labor and tax disputes he’s faced previously and calling him a “perennial loser.” He’s facing Elise Stefanik, the establishment pick, for the chance to take on Democrat Aaron Woolf in the general.


2016 WATCH

CLINTON: A Gallup poll released Wednesday reveals that Hillary Clinton’s approval rating has dipped slightly in recent months, dropping from 59 percent in February to 54 percent. Though she is still favored by a majority, this new rating is her lowest since August 2008.

On the second day of her book tour, she again drew ridicule from Republicans, this time for misidentifying Abraham Lincoln as a senator from Illinois — her home state — when he was in fact a member of the House before he became president.

Clinton also said her comments that she and foerm President Clinton were “dead broke” when they left office were “not the most artful.”

BUSH:According to a poll from the Saint Leo University Polling Institute, Hillary Clinton would win Florida against five of six potential Republican nominees examined. The only potential Republican nominee Clinton would lose to would be former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, whom the poll predicts would win by a 2-point margin.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

Dead broke ... Really?”

—Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to Hillary Clinton at a Chicago event, in reference to her recent comments about leaving the White House without any money