Clinton wins Washington, D.C. primary
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Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThere are many unanswered questions about FBI culture FBI agent who sent anti-Trump texts offers to testify on Capitol Hill Giuliani wants 'full and complete' investigation into Russia probe's origins MORE is projected to win the Washington, D.C., primary.

The victory will give Clinton a majority of Washington’s 20 pledged delegates and send her into next month’s convention on a high note.

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After a tough challenge by rival Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) Sanders If Congress takes no action, the Social Security trust fund will become depleted in 2034 Ex-campaign manager: Sanders is still eying another presidential bid DNC chair backing plan to cut superdelegates opposed by Dem lawmakers MORE, Clinton closed out the primary season winning four of the final six contests. She will finish with an advantage of nearly 400 pledged delegates over Sanders.

Clinton won’t have earned enough pledged delegates from the primaries and caucuses to secure the nomination outright — Democrats rarely do — but superdelegates will push her across the threshold at the convention in Philadelphia in July.

The only remaining question is when and how Sanders decides to exit the race.

Clinton and Sanders were scheduled to meet Tuesday evening, and he will speak to his supporters in a video address Thursday.

Many Democrats are hopeful he’ll drop out of the race out that point and begin the process of unifying his millions of supporters behind Clinton ahead of a general election match-up against Republican Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpEx-ethics chief calls on Trump to end 'monstrous' migrant policies Laura Bush blasts Trump migrant policy as 'cruel' and 'immoral' US denies report of coalition airstrike on Syria MORE.

Sanders is expected to try to push the Democratic platform in a more progressive direction at the convention. 

He may also use leverage earned through the primaries to push through rules changes, such as the elimination of superdelegates.