Santorum: Bin Laden raid won't save Obama in 2012

Former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) said President Obama remains beatable in 2012 despite the bump he's expected to get after the U.S. raid that killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

Stumping in Iowa on Monday, the likely 2012 presidential hopeful invoked the 1992 presidential election, arguing that no matter how high Obama's poll numbers temporarily climb, the GOP shouldn't be discouraged. 

"As we saw in 1992, ‘What have you done for me lately?’ is a very important and, I think, appropriate way the American public looks at these situations," Santorum told Radio Iowa in an interview on Monday. "It’s not what you’ve accomplished – that’s certainly a factor – but ‘What are you doing?’ and ‘What will you do?’ that’s much more important."

After the first Gulf War in 1991, former President George H.W. Bush's approval numbers skyrocketed, reaching as high as 87 percent in the spring of the year before the election. He ended up losing to Democrat Bill Clinton in November 1992.

Obama's approval numbers are expected to spike in the aftermath of the raid that killed bin Laden. Pollsters predicted Monday that the bump could range anywhere from 8 to 15 percentage points.

According to the latest Gallup tracking data, Obama's approval stands at 46 percent.