Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) criticized the efforts of some in his party to use the threat of shutting down the government to force defunding of ObamaCare, warning the move was politically "quite dicey" and unrealistic.

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"I'd just add a little dose of reality," the potential presidential candidate said at the National Press Club on Wednesday, following statements from Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R).

"If you control one-half of one-third of leverage in Washington, D.C., your ability to influence things are also relative to the fact that you have one-half of one-third of the government... It's a reality. This isn't a hypothetical. So as we get closer to these deadlines, there needs to be an understanding of that, or politically it's quite dicey for the Republican Party."

Bush's remarks reflect the views of many establishment Republicans that the push from congressional conservatives — including Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Finance: GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few no votes | Highlights from day two of markup | House votes to overturn joint-employer rule | Senate panel approves North Korean banking sanctions GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few ready to vote against it Anti-gay marriage county clerk Kim Davis to seek reelection in Kentucky MORE (R-Texas), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Health Care: Trump officials to allow work requirements for Medicaid GOP senator: CBO moving the goalposts on ObamaCare mandate Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday MORE (R-Utah), and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Cybersecurity: What we learned from Carter Page's House Intel testimony | House to mark up foreign intel reform law | FBI can't access Texas shooter's phone | Sessions to testify at hearing amid Russia scrutiny Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday This week: GOP seeks to advance tax overhaul MORE (R-Fla.), Bush's protege — is untenable strategically and damaging politically.

The fight has led to a bitter public split between the two factions of the GOP. Bush has long hewed more toward the establishment end of the Republican spectrum.