Study: Trump at lowest grammar level of candidates
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The study, by the Language Technologies Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, scored Trump’s grammar at a fifth-grade level. The rest of the candidates’ grammar was scored between sixth- and eighth-grade levels.
 
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The study looked at nearly 40 speeches from the 2016 campaign cycle delivered by Trump, GOP rivals Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea GOP state lawmakers meet to plan possible constitutional convention MORE and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Trump bets base will stick with him on immigration MORE, and Democratic candidates Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Dems fear lasting damage from Clinton-Sanders fight MORE.
 
All candidates performed better when graded on their vocabulary skills.
 
Sanders scored highest in vocab, ranking at the 11th-grade level in the speech he made announcing his candidacy.
 
Trump and Clinton both scored at the eighth-grade level for vocab in the speeches announcing their candidacies. Cruz’s inaugural speech was at the ninth-grade level.
 
“This analysis shows the changes that candidates make in the level of their speech according to the type of speech. It also reflects each candidate’s combination of personal delivery style and their analysis of the level of the audience they want to address,” the study’s authors wrote.