Study: Trump at lowest grammar level of candidates
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Republican presidential candidate Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpO’Malley tells Dems not to fear Trump Right way and wrong way Five things to know about the elephant trophies controversy MORE is leading in the polls but losing at grammar, according to a new study.
 
The study, by the Language Technologies Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, scored Trump’s grammar at a fifth-grade level. The rest of the candidates’ grammar was scored between sixth- and eighth-grade levels.
 
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The study looked at nearly 40 speeches from the 2016 campaign cycle delivered by Trump, GOP rivals Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTexas Republicans slam White House over disaster relief request Dem rep: Trump disaster aid request is 'how you let America down again' Moore endorsements disappear from campaign website MORE and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioCongress faces growing health care crisis in Puerto Rico The Hill's 12:30 Report Colbert mocks Trump for sipping water during speech on Asia trip MORE, and Democratic candidates Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonO’Malley tells Dems not to fear Trump FBI informant gathered years of evidence on Russian push for US nuclear fuel deals, including Uranium One, memos show Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDe Blasio headed to Iowa to speak at political fundraiser Yes, spills happen — but pipelines are still the safest way to move oil Why sexual harassment discussions include lawmakers talking about Bill Clinton’s past MORE.
 
All candidates performed better when graded on their vocabulary skills.
 
Sanders scored highest in vocab, ranking at the 11th-grade level in the speech he made announcing his candidacy.
 
Trump and Clinton both scored at the eighth-grade level for vocab in the speeches announcing their candidacies. Cruz’s inaugural speech was at the ninth-grade level.
 
“This analysis shows the changes that candidates make in the level of their speech according to the type of speech. It also reflects each candidate’s combination of personal delivery style and their analysis of the level of the audience they want to address,” the study’s authors wrote.