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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie rates second with 13 percent, followed by Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Cybersecurity: What we learned from Carter Page's House Intel testimony | House to mark up foreign intel reform law | FBI can't access Texas shooter's phone | Sessions to testify at hearing amid Russia scrutiny Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday This week: GOP seeks to advance tax overhaul MORE (Fla.) with 12 percent and Jeb Bush with 11 percent. Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Finance: GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few no votes | Highlights from day two of markup | House votes to overturn joint-employer rule | Senate panel approves North Korean banking sanctions GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few ready to vote against it Anti-gay marriage county clerk Kim Davis to seek reelection in Kentucky MORE (Texas) and Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanGOP rep: Virginia defeat 'a referendum' on Trump administration After Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem Pence: Praying 'takes nothing away' from trying to figure out causes behind mass shooting MORE (Wis.) garner 10 percent. Nineteen percent of Republicans are undecided. 

Rubio’s numbers have dropped 7 percent since an April survey. 

The numbers contrast with a Democratic affiliated Public Policy Polling survey released last week that showed Cruz surging after his 21-hour floor speech against ObamaCare. Cruz closely trails Paul among Tea Party voters, taking 20 percent. 

Fifty-eight percent of people say they have not heard enough about Cruz to form an opinion. 

On the Democratic side, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGOP rushes to cut ties to Moore Papadopoulos was in regular contact with Stephen Miller, helped edit Trump speech: report Bannon jokes Clinton got her ‘ass kicked’ in 2016 election MORE continues to dominate a potential 2016 Democratic primary, with 61 percent of Democrats saying they would vote for her. Vice President Biden takes 11 percent. Those numbers are largely unchanged since Quinnipiac’s last poll in May. 

The poll surveyed 1,497 registered voters and has a margin of error of 2.5 percent.