Liberal group Americans United for Change is teaming up with a trio of large unions to air television ads attacking House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorEric Cantor: Moore ‘deserves to lose’ If we want to make immigration great again, let's make it bipartisan Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns MORE (R-Va.) and seven potentially vulnerable Republicans for their stance on raising the debt ceiling.

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The targets: Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerDems look to use Moore against GOP Senate hearing shows Fed chair nominee acts the part Senate GOP votes to begin debate on tax bill MORE (R-Nev.) and Reps. Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.), Steve King (R-Iowa), Lou BarlettaLouis (Lou) James BarlettaDems look to use Moore against GOP Democrats expand House map after election victories GOP Senate hopefuls reluctant to back McConnell as leader MORE (R-Pa.), Chip Cravaack (R-Minn.), Bobby Schilling (R-Ill.) and Ann Marie Buerkle (R-N.Y.). All are potentially vulnerable members who live in inexpensive media markets. Rehberg is running for Senate.

The unions participating in the six-figure ad buy are the Service Employees International Union, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the National Education Association. The ads will run from Friday through Monday.

"If Congress doesn’t act by Tuesday, America won’t be able to pay all of its bills," one version of the ad begins. "

Social Security checks, veterans benefits, military pay — all could be at risk because Congressman Bobby Schilling and congressional Republicans want to protect tax breaks for millionaires, oil companies and corporate jets. 

So if the check you or your family depends on doesn’t arrive, thank Congressman Schilling. 
Tell Congressman Schilling to stop holding the interests of ordinary Americans hostage."

House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJohn Feehery: A political forest fire Trump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery MORE (R-Ohio) had to cancel a planned vote on his plan to raise the debt ceiling Thursday night for the next six months because he could not get enough conservative Republicans to support it. It is unclear what, if any, deal can get enough support to pass through both chambers of Congress before Tuesday.


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