House GOP chairman narrowly survives primary challenge
© Greg Nash

Rep. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyHouse passes tariff-relief bill GOP may increase IRS’s budget Overnight Finance: Congress barrels toward another shutdown crisis | Canada worries Trump will withdraw from NAFTA | Blue-state Republicans push tax law changes | Chamber CEO calls out Bannon, Warren MORE, the Texas Republican who chairs the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, narrowly prevailed in a primary race on Tuesday.

The 10-term lawmaker eked out a projected win with 53 percent of the vote, according to The Associated Press, just barely above the minimum of 50.1 percent to avoid a May runoff.

Tea Party-backed former Texas state Rep. Steve Toth finished in second place with 38 percent of the vote.

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Brady went up against three primary challengers after serving as the House Ways and Means Committee chairman only since November. In addition to Toth, he faced Craig McMichael, who challenged him in 2014, and Andre Dean, a retired lieutenant colonel.

Brady won the Ways and Means gavel last year after his predecessor, Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGOP leaders pitch children's health funding in plan to avert shutdown Lawmakers see shutdown’s odds rising Fix what we’ve got and make Medicare right this year MORE (R-Wis.), resigned to become Speaker. Brady had previously sought the post in 2014 but lost to Ryan at the time.

Tuesday was a good night for incumbent House Republicans in Texas, all of whom are projected to win and avoid runoffs.

House Rules Committee Chairman Pete Sessions and House Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, along with Republican Study Committee Chairman Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresCongress should stand for rural America by enhancing broadband connectivity GOP could punt funding fight to January Trump calls for welfare reform as he rallies GOP for tax vote MORE, all edged out primary challengers.

Other longtime incumbents including Reps. Joe Barton, Sam JohnsonSamuel (Sam) Robert JohnsonNew chairmen named for health, tax subcommittees Seven Texas lawmakers leaving Congress means a younger, more diverse delegation The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill MORE, John Culberson and Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertGOP leaders pitch children's health funding in plan to avert shutdown House headed for cliffhanger vote on NSA surveillance Gohmert: Mueller 'would love to get Trump's scalp' MORE also easily fended off their GOP opponents.

In Alabama, Republican Reps. Martha RobyMartha Dubina RobyFormer Moore campaign manager to challenge GOP rep in Alabama Brooks’s prior attacks on Trump could hurt in Alabama Senate race How the GOP came to dominate, and be dominated by, rural voters MORE and Bradley Byrne both successfully avoided runoffs against their primary challengers.