House incumbents easily survive challenges

House incumbents in Illinois and Ohio prevailed in their primary races on Tuesday despite the anti-establishment fervor that's shaken up the presidential campaign.

A handful of Republican and Democratic lawmakers faced tough challenges. They nonetheless all managed to secure victory by comfortable margins largely due to fundraising edges and better name recognition.

Tuesday's results are consistent with the other four states that have conducted House primaries so far this cycle. Voters in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi and Arkansas also retained incumbent lawmakers over challengers who said their districts needed a change of representation on Capitol Hill.

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GOP front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDems flip Wisconsin state Senate seat Sessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants GOP rep: 'Sheet metal and garbage' everywhere in Haiti MORE won the Illinois presidential primary, while Ohio Gov. John Kasich won his home state's contest.

But the support for Trump at the top of the ticket in Illinois didn't translate into insurgent upsets over GOP incumbents.

Rep. John Shimkus (R-Ill.), who faced the most significant primary challenge among Illinois House Republicans, easily brushed aside his opponent, Club for Growth-backed state Sen. Kyle McCarter.

McCarter posed the most serious challenge to Shimkus, who's serving his 10th term, since 2002. In addition to attacking Shimkus's conservative credentials, McCarter criticized the incumbent's decision to break a pledge to serve only six terms.

Shimkus nonetheless prevailed, with more than 60 percent of the vote, according to an Associated Press tally that projected him as the victor.

And in Ohio, Republican Rep. David Joyce prevailed in a rematch against former state Rep. Matt Lynch.

Lynch argued that Joyce wasn't conservative enough, pointing to his votes in support of hiking the debt limit and last year's omnibus spending package. But recent campaign finance records showed that Joyce far outraised his opponent, taking in more than $1 million while Lynch received less than $200,000.

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyHouse passes tariff-relief bill GOP may increase IRS’s budget Overnight Finance: Congress barrels toward another shutdown crisis | Canada worries Trump will withdraw from NAFTA | Blue-state Republicans push tax law changes | Chamber CEO calls out Bannon, Warren MORE (R-Texas) barely avoided a runoff earlier this month, but he still managed to clear the minimum threshold. His primary election result has so far been the narrowest margin of victory this cycle.

Rep. Bobby Rush (D-Ill.) faced the most significant challenge among Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday.

The 12-term lawmaker is a fixture of Chicago's political scene and a senior member of the Congressional Black Caucus. But this year, he faced a challenge from Chicago Alderman Howard Brookins, who had endorsed Rush in his 2000 primary against then-state Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaMcCarthy: ‘No deadline on DACA’ Democrats will need to explain if they shut government down over illegal immigration Trump’s first year in office was the year of the woman MORE.

Rush nearly failed to make this year's primary ballot after Brookins raised questions about whether the 69-year-old incumbent had collected enough signatures. Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan threw his support behind Brookins in a departure from the norm of endorsing incumbent lawmakers.

Still, Rush won the primary with more than 70 percent of the vote, according to a projection from the AP.

Ohio featured the most high-profile open seat of the night, a GOP primary to replace former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE (R).

Businessman Warren Davidson emerged as the victor in the crowded 15-way primary. Endorsements from the Club for Growth and fellow Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, who chairs the House Freedom Caucus that led the push for BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE's ouster, boosted Davidson's campaign.

Like former House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorEric Cantor: Moore ‘deserves to lose’ If we want to make immigration great again, let's make it bipartisan Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns MORE (R-Va.), who lost his primary two years ago, Boehner might be succeeded by someone likely to join the Freedom Caucus, which frequently upended both ex-leaders' agenda.