The group maxed out for both the primary and general campaigns of Reps. Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.), Jim BridenstineJames (Jim) Frederick BridenstineOvernight Energy: Dems go on attack at EPA chief's hearing | Pruitt backs national fuel standard | Bill Nye sparks controversy with State of the Union plans | Greens sue over wolf protections Bill Nye's company says SOTU attendance not an endorsement Scientists' group rips Bill Nye over SOTU attendance: He 'does not speak for us' MORE (R-Okla.) and Steve StockmanStephen (Steve) Ernest StockmanSpaceX launch is step one in a new American-dominated space race McConnell must go nuclear: Abolish the legislative filibuster Ex-GOP staffer pleads guilty to fraud, money laundering on behalf of ex-lawmaker MORE (R-Texas).

And Reps. David SchweikertDavid SchweikertFive obstacles to Trump's infrastructure ambitions The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill GOP Senate hopeful Kelli Ward leads challengers in internal poll MORE (R-Ariz.), Ron DeSantis (R-Fla.), Mich Mulvaney (R-S.C.) and Matt SalmonMatthew (Matt) James SalmonQuiet jockeying for McCain seat angers Republicans McSally tells GOP colleagues she'll run for Arizona Senate GOP Senate hopeful Kelli Ward leads challengers in internal poll MORE (R-Ariz.) all received the maximum contribution, $5,000, to just their primary campaigns.

For Reps. Tom McClintock (R-Calif.) and John Mica (R-Fla.), the group only contributed $1,000 to their primary campaigns, and Rep. Ted YohoTheodore (Ted) Scott YohoTo end sugar subsidies, conservatives can't launch a frontal attack Fierce battle erupts over releasing intelligence report Trouble brewing as GOP struggles with spending bill votes MORE (R-Fla.) received only $2,500 for his primary campaign. Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump, GOP at new crossroads on deficit Rand Paul revels in role of Senate troublemaker GOP lawmaker hits Trump over Dem memo: Americans deserve to read both MORE received $5,000 toward his 2010 primary debt.

All are in comfortably red districts, but many faced potential or actual primary challengers in 2012, and the contributions to their primary campaigns could help prevent similar opponents from emerging this cycle.

Citizens United PVF also contributed $5,000 each to the leadership PACs of Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulDem wins Kentucky state House seat in district Trump won by 49 points GOP's tax reform bait-and-switch will widen inequality Pentagon budget euphoria could be short-lived MORE (R-Ky.) and Reps. Steve Scalise (R-La.), Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), Tim GriffinJohn (Tim) Timothy GriffinFlynn discloses lobbying that may have helped Turkey Tea Party class reassesses record Huckabee's daughter to run '16 campaign MORE (R-Ark.), Andy Harris (R-Md.) and Steve King (R-Iowa). Scalise and Griffin were floated as potential Senate candidates but declined to run, while King is a likely contender for Iowa's open Senate seat.

It also gave $11,500 to the primary campaign of Josh Mandel, for his reelection as Ohio state treasurer.

The contributions overall are an early indication of the races in which Citizens United is likely to engage, according to David Bossie, the group's president.

"Citizens United Political Victory Fund gives money to candidates who deserve the support of our membership and we will be heavily involved during the 2014 cycle," he said.