Next test for Tea Party is running multiple campaigns in general election

After helping fuel Republican primary upsets in seven Senate seats across the country, the Tea Party faces a much tougher test -- turning its attention to November's general election, where the group will attempt to focus on several races at the same time.

"After we finish doing somersaults and backflips over last night, the focus obviously shifts to November," Tea Party Express spokesman Levi Russell said Wednesday.

It will be a drastically differently dynamic for the group, which proved so influential during the primary season in part because it was able to focus on just one race at a time.

Faced with several high profile Senate contests presents a major challenge to the Tea Party Express, which doesn't appear to have the resources in terms of money or manpower to expend its energy in several states at once.

One thing going for the group, said Russell, is that over the course of the primary season, the number of states they worked in allowed them to lay down a grassroots base to build on ahead of November.

Even in the run up to Tuesday, the Tea Party Express made a conscious choice to center its resources on Christine O'Donnell in Delaware.

Even though Tea Party-backed Senate candidate Ovide Lamontagne narrowly lost in New Hampshire, Russell said the group had no regrets about ignoring that state's Senate primary.

"Only having limited resources we chose Delaware to be the focus because Mike Castle has been one of the worst offenders opposing Tea Party ideals over the years," Russell said.

The group is in the process of strategizing and laying out an organizing plan ahead of November.

"All options are on the table as to how to best be effective in the general election," said Russell. "But I can tell you that the momentum is on the side of the Tea Party right now, and I think that really widens up our options."