Clinton leads likely 2016 GOP contenders by 7 to 9 points
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWoman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Trump: CNN, MSNBC 'got scammed' into covering Russian-organized rally Pennsylvania Democrats set to win big with new district map MORE sweeps the potential 2016 Democratic field for president and leads possible Republican contenders by margins of 7 percentage points to 9 percentage points, a new poll suggests.

A Quinnipiac University survey released Tuesday found Clinton would win 58 percent of the vote among Democratic candidates. 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) came in second with 11 percent of the vote, Vice President Biden received 9 percent, and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo got 4 percent. Warren has said she doesn’t intend to launch a White House bid, Biden has hinted at one, and Cuomo’s ambitions remain unclear.

Meanwhile, no front-runner exists in the GOP presidential field.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulDem wins Kentucky state House seat in district Trump won by 49 points GOP's tax reform bait-and-switch will widen inequality Pentagon budget euphoria could be short-lived MORE (R-Ky.) leads his possible competitors with 11 percent; Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.), former Govs. Mike Huckabee (R-Ark.) and Jeb Bush (R-Fla.) each won 10 percent; Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Gov. Scott Walker (R-Wis.) and Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanRepublicans are avoiding gun talks as election looms The Hill's 12:30 Report Flake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan MORE (R-Wis.) each received 8 percent, and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) has 6 percent support.

Twenty percent of voters are undecided about who to back in the Republican Party.

In potential matchups, Clinton would lead Christie, Paul and Huckabee by 9 percentage points. She would lead Bush and Ryan by 7 percentage points.

The poll found 48 percent have a favorable view of Clinton, while 43 percent said they have an unfavorable view.

As for this November’s midterm elections, 46 percent of voters want Republicans to win control of the Senate, while 44 percent want Democrats to maintain their majority. That same margin applies to voters’ hopes for the makeup of the House. 

Despite the slightly stronger support for GOP control, more voters disapprove of Republicans in Congress than Democrats. More than 70 percent disapproves of GOP lawmakers, while 63 percent disapproves of Democrats.

The poll surveyed 1,446 voters between June 24 and 30 with a 2.6-percentage-point margin of error.