Obama leads among young voters, but many might not vote

President Obama has a massive lead on Mitt Romney among young voters, but getting those voters to turn out on Election Day could be a challenge, according to a Gallup poll released on Thursday.

Obama leads Romney 64 percent to 29 with voters under the age of 30, but only 60 percent of this demographic is registered to vote, the lowest percentage among any age group, according to Gallup.

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Obama has a 5 percent lead on Romney with 30- to 49-year-olds, 75 percent of whom are registered, and leads by 4 percent with 50- to 64-year-olds, 85 percent of whom are registered to vote.

Romney leads Obama by 12 percent with those over the age of 65; 92 percent in that age group are registered to vote.

The disparity among young voters who said they will definitely cast a ballot in November is even greater — only 56 percent said they would definitely vote. All of the other age groups registered at 80 percent or above.

Obama heavily courted youths in the 2008 election and they came out in force for him.

The poll comes as the president made an appeal to young voters, speaking at rallies on college campuses in the battleground states of North Carolina, Iowa and Colorado, urging Congress to act to prevent a hike in student loan interest rates.

The trips were billed as official White House business, but Republicans in Congress are calling on the president to reimburse taxpayers for the cost of the trips, saying they were campaign-oriented visits.

House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), meanwhile, scheduled a Friday vote in the lower chamber on a measure to stop student loans interest rates from doubling this summer. His surprise move, which he announced late Wednesday, was seen as Republicans' attempt to counter Obama's appeal to youth and to give them political cover on an issue Democrats have criticized them on.

Obama leads Romney nationally, according to Gallup, 49 percent to 43, and the president’s approval rating has remained in positive territory recently, with 50 percent approval and 44 disapproval.