Mitt Romney’s standing in the presidential race has not changed since he announced Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanOPINION | Healthcare vote a political death wish for GOP in 2018 The one part of ObamaCare that must be repealed now Senate Dems warn they will block recess appointments MORE (R-Wis.) as his running mate, according to the latest national daily-tracking poll from Gallup.

Romney led Gallup’s national daily-tracking poll 46 percent to 45 over President Obama in the four days prior to the Ryan announcement, and has led Obama 47 to 45 percent in the four days since. That’s a bump of 1 percentage point for Romney, although the daily Gallup poll has a 3 percent margin of error.

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The findings are consistent with a poll Gallup released on Monday, which found a plurality of Americans were not enthusiastic about the Ryan pick.

Forty-two percent said they viewed Ryan’s candidacy as a “fair” or “poor” move by the Romney campaign, compared to 39 percent who said it was an “excellent” or “pretty good” choice.

Romney campaign pollster Neil Newhouse attributed the low marks to Ryan not being widely known outside of Washington or his home state of Wisconsin.



“All these numbers indicate is the simple fact that Congressman Paul Ryan was not a nationally known figure prior to being named as Gov. Romney's vice-presidential pick,” he told USA Today.

According to Gallup, in 2008 Sen. John McCainJohn McCainOvernight Defense: House passes Russia sanctions deal | McCain returns to Senate | Watchdog opens criminal probe into M camo mistake Tough road ahead for McConnell on ObamaCare Overnight Healthcare: Senate votes to begin ObamaCare repeal debate | McCain returns to vote | GOP floats scaled-down healthcare bill MORE (R-Ariz.) saw a two-point bump in the immediate aftermath of his selection of then-Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, and Obama lost two points after unveiling then-Sen. Joe BidenJoe BidenSanders keeping door open on 2020 Biden deflects questions about 2020 run at OZY Fest The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE )D-Del.) as his running mate.

In the four elections prior to 2008, the challengers saw bounces of between 3 and 9 percent after making their VP picks.

Obama leads Romney nationally by 3.5 percent, according to the Real Clear Politics average of polls. While the two most closely followed daily tracking polls, Gallup and Rasmussen, show Romney in the lead, every other major poll released in August shows Obama in the lead.