Poll: Overwhelming majority think Trump, Clinton will be nominees
© Greg Nash - Getty Images

An overwhelming majority believes that Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN analyst Kirsten Powers: Melania's jacket should read 'Let them eat cake' CNN's Cuomo confronts Lewandowski over 'womp womp' remark Sessions says FBI agent Peter Strzok no longer has his security clearance MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSessions says FBI agent Peter Strzok no longer has his security clearance Melania Trump puzzles with 'I really don't care' jacket Grassley wants to subpoena Comey, Lynch after critical IG report MORE will be their respective parties' presidential nominees, a new national poll released Monday finds.

The CNN/ORC poll found that 84 percent of voters think Trump will win the GOP nomination and 85 percent believe that Clinton will clinch the Democratic nomination. The two are both front-runners in their races.

ADVERTISEMENT
While voters believe Trump and Clinton will square off in the general election, that doesn't necessarily translate into support. Fifty-one percent of the Democratic voters surveyed support Clinton and 49 percent of GOP voters back Trump.

Among Republicans, 25 percent of voters support Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Gang of Four to meet next week on immigration Live coverage: High drama as hardline immigration bill fails, compromise vote delayed Trump renews call to end filibuster amid immigration furor MORE, followed by 19 percent who back John Kasich. Trump’s support in the polls has been consistent since March. He also polls slightly higher among male voters.

On the Democratic side, 43 percent support Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBernie Sanders: Trump thinks like an authoritarian Democrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor Trump's America fights back MORE. He’s polling 8 points behind Clinton, a gap that has remained the same since March.

The poll was conducted from April 28 to May 1 and surveyed 1,001 adults via phone. The breakdown includes 405 registered voters who are Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents and 406 registered voters who are Republicans and GOP-leaning independent voters.

The margin of error for both the Republican and Democratic voter samples was 5 points.