Poll: Overwhelming majority think Trump, Clinton will be nominees
© Greg Nash - Getty Images

An overwhelming majority believes that Donald TrumpDonald TrumpScarborough defends CNN against Trump: CNN 'has more integrity' Time asks Trump Organization to remove fake cover from golf clubs Why UK millennials voting for socialism could happen here, too MORE and Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonPro-Trump group pulls ads targeting GOP senator on ObamaCare repeal Stone to testify before House Intel Committee next month Overnight Cybersecurity: New ransomware attack spreads globally | US pharma giant hit | House intel panel interviews Podesta | US, Kenya deepen cyber partnership MORE will be their respective parties' presidential nominees, a new national poll released Monday finds.

The CNN/ORC poll found that 84 percent of voters think Trump will win the GOP nomination and 85 percent believe that Clinton will clinch the Democratic nomination. The two are both front-runners in their races.

ADVERTISEMENT
While voters believe Trump and Clinton will square off in the general election, that doesn't necessarily translate into support. Fifty-one percent of the Democratic voters surveyed support Clinton and 49 percent of GOP voters back Trump.

Among Republicans, 25 percent of voters support Ted CruzTed CruzThree more GOP senators announce opposition to healthcare bill Senate GOP delays ObamaCare repeal vote past recess Club for Growth opposes Senate ObamaCare repeal bill MORE, followed by 19 percent who back John Kasich. Trump’s support in the polls has been consistent since March. He also polls slightly higher among male voters.

On the Democratic side, 43 percent support Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders: FBI inquiry of wife is 'pathetic' attack Why UK millennials voting for socialism could happen here, too WATCH LIVE: Senate Dems hold ‘People’s Filibuster’ against ObamaCare repeal MORE. He’s polling 8 points behind Clinton, a gap that has remained the same since March.

The poll was conducted from April 28 to May 1 and surveyed 1,001 adults via phone. The breakdown includes 405 registered voters who are Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents and 406 registered voters who are Republicans and GOP-leaning independent voters.

The margin of error for both the Republican and Democratic voter samples was 5 points.