A nearly identical 73 percent of voters support expanding background checks in North Carolina, and more than half — 52 percent — say they're more likely to support Hagan because she backed the bill.

The pair's colleagues from across the aisle — Sens. David VitterDavid Bruce VitterTrump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge Where is due process in all the sexual harassment allegations? Not the Senate's job to second-guess Alabama voters MORE (R-La.) and Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Cybersecurity: Zuckerberg breaks silence on Cambridge Analytica | Senators grill DHS chief on election security | Omnibus to include election cyber funds | Bill would create 'bug bounty' for State Omnibus to include election cybersecurity funds Overnight Cybersecurity: Senate Intel releases election security findings | Facebook to meet with officials on Capitol Hill amid Cambridge Analytica fallout | Orbitz admits possible breach MORE (R-N.C.) — saw a corresponding decline in popularity. Half of North Carolinians say they're less likely to support Burr because of his gun vote, and four in 10 Louisianans say the same about Vitter.

PPP released polls earlier this week showing that senators from Alaska, Arizona, Nevada and Ohio were also facing a backlash over their refusal to back the gun control bill, which fell five votes short of the 60 required in the Senate.

Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Project Veritas at risk of losing fundraising license in New York, AG warns You want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible MORE and Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Politics is purple in North Carolina Democrats can win North Carolina just like Jimmy Carter did in 1976 MORE helped their chances for reelection by supporting background checks,” said Dean Debnam, president of Public Policy Polling, in a statement. “Their constituents overwhelmingly support the stance they took on this issue and are ready to reward them for it at the ballot box next year.”