ADVERTISEMENT
A nearly identical 73 percent of voters support expanding background checks in North Carolina, and more than half — 52 percent — say they're more likely to support Hagan because she backed the bill.

The pair's colleagues from across the aisle — Sens. David VitterDavid VitterOvernight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator Former senator who crafted chemicals law to lobby for chemicals industry MORE (R-La.) and Richard BurrRichard BurrSenate intel panel to hold hearing on Russian meddling in Europe Overnight Tech: Uber CEO resigns | Trump's Iowa tech trip | Dems push Sessions to block AT&T-Time Warner deal | Lawmakers warned on threat to election systems | Overnight Cybersecurity: Obama DHS chief defends Russian hack response | Trump huddles on grid security | Lawmakers warned about cyber threat to election systems MORE (R-N.C.) — saw a corresponding decline in popularity. Half of North Carolinians say they're less likely to support Burr because of his gun vote, and four in 10 Louisianans say the same about Vitter.

PPP released polls earlier this week showing that senators from Alaska, Arizona, Nevada and Ohio were also facing a backlash over their refusal to back the gun control bill, which fell five votes short of the 60 required in the Senate.

Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuMeet Mitch Landrieu, the 2020 dark-horse Dem Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Five unanswered questions after Trump's upset victory MORE and Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE helped their chances for reelection by supporting background checks,” said Dean Debnam, president of Public Policy Polling, in a statement. “Their constituents overwhelmingly support the stance they took on this issue and are ready to reward them for it at the ballot box next year.”