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A nearly identical 73 percent of voters support expanding background checks in North Carolina, and more than half — 52 percent — say they're more likely to support Hagan because she backed the bill.

The pair's colleagues from across the aisle — Sens. David VitterDavid VitterYou're fired! Why it's time to ditch the Fed's community banker seat Overnight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator MORE (R-La.) and Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrJuan Williams: The shame of Trump's enablers Five takeaways from the social media hearings Overnight Tech: Senators demand tech firms do more on Russian meddling | House Intel releases Russian-promoted ads | Apple CEO says 'fake news' bigger threat than ads | Ex-Yahoo CEO, Equifax execs to testify on breaches MORE (R-N.C.) — saw a corresponding decline in popularity. Half of North Carolinians say they're less likely to support Burr because of his gun vote, and four in 10 Louisianans say the same about Vitter.

PPP released polls earlier this week showing that senators from Alaska, Arizona, Nevada and Ohio were also facing a backlash over their refusal to back the gun control bill, which fell five votes short of the 60 required in the Senate.

Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuYou want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' MORE and Kay HaganKay HaganDemocrats can win North Carolina just like Jimmy Carter did in 1976 North Carolina will be a big battleground state in 2020 Linking repatriation to job creation MORE helped their chances for reelection by supporting background checks,” said Dean Debnam, president of Public Policy Polling, in a statement. “Their constituents overwhelmingly support the stance they took on this issue and are ready to reward them for it at the ballot box next year.”