Former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonMueller asks WH staff to preserve all documents about Trump Jr. meeting: report OPINION | Hey Dems, Russia won't define 2018, so why not fix your party's problems instead? Russian lawyer who met Trump Jr. represented spy agency: report MORE (D) remains the clear front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, while New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) narrowly leads a packed field of GOP contenders, according to a CNN-ORC poll released Monday.

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According to the survey, 65 percent of Democrats or liberal-leaning independents say they would back Clinton for the presidential nomination. Vice President Biden came in a distant second at 10 percent, followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTrump's new communications chief once called him a 'hack' OPINION | Hey Dems, Russia won't define 2018, so why not fix your party's problems instead? The private alternative to the National Flood Insurance Program  MORE (D-Mass.) at 7 percent, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at 6 percent and Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley at 2 percent.

Biden headlined a high-profile Democratic fundraiser in the early caucus state of Iowa on Sunday, and political watchers are debating whether the vice president would challenge Clinton in the Democratic primary if she were to decide to run.

The Republican field is far more crowded. Christie leads at 17 percent, just edging Rep. Paul RyanPaul RyanWant bipartisan health reform? Make the debate honest again Ex-CBO directors defend against GOP attacks on ObamaCare analysis Ryan: CBO's healthcare estimate is 'bogus' MORE (R-Wis.) at 16 percent. Ryan was the Republican vice presidential candidate in 2012.

Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulThe Hill's 12:30 Report Senate heads to new healthcare vote with no clear plan Overnight Healthcare: CBO predicts 22M would lose coverage under Senate ObamaCare replacement MORE (R-Ky.) came in third at 13 percent, followed by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush (R) at 10 percent, Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioBush ethics lawyer: Congress must tell Trump not to fire Mueller The private alternative to the National Flood Insurance Program  Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power MORE (R-Fla.) at 9 percent, Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzEx-CBO directors defend against GOP attacks on ObamaCare analysis Cruz: GOP will 'look like fools' if ObamaCare isn’t repealed The GOP Wonder Women who saved healthcare for 22 million MORE (R-Texas) at 7 percent and former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) at 5 percent. Santorum was the foremost challenger to Mitt Romney for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination.

Clinton and Christie are two of the most popular political figures in the country, and both routinely register strong favorability ratings in public opinion polls. One Quinnipiac University poll from last month showed Clinton edging Christie 46 to 40 in a head-to-head match-up.

None of the potential candidates have publicly committed to a 2016 run. However, Ready for Hillary, a super-PAC pushing the former New York senator to run, is loaded with former Obama campaign activists.

The CNN-ORC poll of 1,022 adults was conducted between Sept. 6 and Sept. 8 and has a 4.5-percentage-point margin of error.