Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLexington mayor launches bid for Congress Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Meet the Iran hawk who could be Trump's next secretary of State MORE (Ky.) narrowly tops a packed group of potential GOP presidential candidates in a poll released Sunday.

According to a CNN-ORC poll, Paul brings in 16 percent of the vote among Republicans and Republican-leaning independents. He is narrowly trailed by Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees House Republican: 'I worry about both sides' of the aisle on DACA Overnight Health Care: 3.6M signed up for ObamaCare in first month | Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' next year | Dems push for more money to fight opioids MORE (Wis.) with 15 percent and Texas Gov. Rick PerryJames (Rick) Richard PerryPerry pictured with falcon, sword during trek to Saudi Arabia Trump promised ‘best people’ would run government — they upended it US oil and gas boom will actually help spur energy revolution MORE with 11 percent, both inside the margin of error. 

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Paul has been coming off an impressive showing at the Conservative Political Action Conference earlier this month, where he won the CPAC straw poll for the second year in a row. He topped another straw poll on Saturday in New Hampshire at the Northeast Republican Leadership Conference. 

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee brought in 10 percent in the new poll, while Florida Gov. Jeb Bush scored 9 percent. Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDebbie Wasserman Schultz marks 10 years as breast cancer survivor Foreign agent registration is no magical shield against Russian propaganda Let Trump be Trump and he'll sail through 2020 MORE (Texas) and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie each had 8 percent. 

Polling in the GOP primary has consistently shown a tight pack, while former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has dominated polls for the Democratic nomination. 

She leads Democrats with 63 percent of the vote compared to Vice President Biden's 13 percent, according to the poll. 

The poll surveyed 367 people affiliated with the Republican party and 372 people aligned with the Democratic Party. It contains a 5-percentage-point margin of error.