Voters see Hillary and Jeb as old hat

A majority of voters see 2016 frontrunners Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPaltry wage gains, rising deficits two key tax reform concerns Trump pressed Sessions to fire FBI agents who sent anti-Trump texts: report DNC sues Russia, Trump campaign and WikiLeaks over alleged election interference MORE (D) and former Fla. Gov. Jeb Bush (R) as a “return to the policies of the past,” according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll that shows the potential perils for each party’s biggest names. 

Fifty one percent of registered voters view Clinton’s policies as retreads of the past, but she’s viewed much more favorably with Democrats. Only twenty three percent hold that view, and 73 percent believe she’ll provide “new ideas for the future.” 

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Bush’s numbers aren’t as strong. Sixty percent of registered voters, and 42 percent of Republicans, see his policies as leaning backwards. 

Bush has been criticized by some conservatives for his support of Common Core education standards and for a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants. Both policies got poor marks from Republicans in the voters, as more than half of them view those positions unfavorably. 

Recently, Bush has said he only supports a pathway to legal status, but has expressed support for a pathway to citizenship in the past. 

The poll also showed largely positive perceptions of Gov. Scott Walker (R-Wis.) and Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioStudents gather outside White House after walkout to protest gun violence Overnight Energy: Senate confirms Bridenstine as NASA chief | Watchdog probes Pruitt’s use of security detail | Emails shine light on EPA science policy changes Senate confirms Trump’s pick to lead NASA MORE (R-Fla.). Fifty three percent of voters said they could back Walker, compared to only 17 percent that said they could not. Fifty six percent said they could support Rubio, while 26 percent could not. 

Those two candidates sported the largest margins of potential support. Bush had only seven percentage points between those who said they could support him and those who couldn’t. Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpIG investigating Comey memos over classified information: report Overnight Defense: Congress poised for busy week on nominations, defense bill | Trump to deliver Naval Academy commencement speech | Trump administration appeals decision to block suspected combatant's transfer Top Pruitt aid requested backdate to resignation letter: report MORE, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamRepublicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller Rand Paul under pressure as Pompeo hunts for votes Dems walk tightrope on Pompeo nomination MORE (R-S.C.) and Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.) all had significantly more voters say they could not back them. 

Clinton fared much better with Democrats, as 86 percent said they could see themselves voting for her, leaps and bounds ahead of the potential support for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenDem senators demand Trump explain ties to Koch brothers 'Fearless Girl' statue to be moved away from Wall Street bull Sanders, Warren, O’Rourke inspire patriotic small donor waves MORE (D-Mass.) and Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenThe Hill's 12:30 Report Biden to decide on White House run at end of year Stormy Daniels’s 'View' is incorrect MORE. And more than half of those Democratic voters said they don’t care whether Clinton receives a coronation or a contested primary. 

The poll surveyed 1,000 adults and has an overall margin of error of 3.1 percent. The Democratic primary sample has a 6.1 percentage point margin, and the GOP primary sample has a 6.5 percentage point margin.