Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Regulation: Net neutrality supporters predict tough court battle | Watchdog to investigate EPA chief's meeting with industry group | Ex-Volkswagen exec gets 7 years for emissions cheating Overnight Tech: Net neutrality supporters predict tough court fight | Warren backs bid to block AT&T, Time Warner merger | NC county refuses to pay ransom to hackers Avalanche of Democratic senators say Franken should resign MORE (D-Mass.) on Thursday said Democrats should not rush to coronate former first lady Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE as their 2016 presidential candidate.

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“I think there needs to be a vigorous debate in the whole question of running for president,” Warren said on “CBS This Morning.”

“I think everyone who is running for president should be talking about what they plan to do to strengthen and rebuild America’s middle class,” she added.

Warren argued that Clinton had not yet made her economic policies clear for voters.

“Charlie, I’ll tell you where I stand on all the key issues,” Warren told host Charlie Rose.

“It’s up to others to say whether they stand there as well, or if they stand in some different place,” she continued, citing her positions on minimum wage, equal pay and trade as examples.

“I’d like to see her address all of these issues,” Warren said of Clinton. “You know, we have a big debate going on right now with trade within the Democratic Party.”

Warren argued that Democratic momentum was too strong to blindly accept any one candidate for 2016. She urged the party’s base to think carefully about whom they will pick as President Obama’s potential replacement.

“I don’t think the Democratic Party is a static thing,” she argued.

Some Democratic operatives have long hoped Warren will challenge Clinton, the presumptive front-runner, for the party’s nomination in 2016. The popular lawmaker said on March 31 she is “not going to run.”