Santorum: Iran deal is 'greatest betrayal' of US security ever

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Former Sen. Rick Santorum on Saturday called the Iran nuclear agreement the "greatest betrayal" of U.S. national security in the history of the United States. 
 
"This is the greatest betrayal of American national security in our history," Santorum, who is running for president, said at the National Security Action Summit in New Hampshire. "[Iran] will cheat. They will violate the agreement. They will continue to sponsor terror all over the world."
 
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Santorum's comments come as the administration is in the middle of trying to sell Congress on the agreement, announced earlier this month. 
 
Secretary of State John Kerry, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew and Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz met with lawmakers in multiple closed-door briefings and public hearings this past week, and they are expected to testify again next week. 
 
Santorum slammed lawmakers, who he suggested don't want to stand up to the administration and have "Stockholm syndrome" when it comes to Obama. 
 
"They are so afraid to fight," he added. "They have now decided that the only way to survive is to go along with him."
 
Lawmakers passed legislation earlier this year that gives them the ability to review and vote on the Iran deal before congressional sanctions can be lifted. But measures from Republicans that would have required it be considered as a treaty — which includes a higher threshold for approval — were rejected. 
 
Santorum said the fact that senators weren't able to get enough votes to back requiring that the Iran agreement be submitted as a treaty — which the administration argues it is not — underscores "how little respect they have for you and how little belief they have in themselves."
 
Under legislation passed earlier this year, Obama ultimately needs to convince 34 lawmakers in the Senate to back the Iran agreement, which would give him enough support to uphold a potential veto of a resolution undercutting the deal in the Senate. 
 
So far, Republicans have largely lined up against the agreement, while Democrats remain skeptical, with only one member of Senate leadership — Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) — throwing his support behind the deal so far. 
 
Santorum, like other Republican presidential candidates, suggested Saturday he would walk away from the Iran agreement on "day one" if he's elected. 
 
"Go through the process of on day one, saying this agreement is no longer enforced for the United States of America," he said, adding that the next president should "draw a line" and tell the Iranian government if it crosses it "we will take actions that make sure you are no longer a threat to the rest of the world."