Clinton dismisses debate, rips GOP on voting rights

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonShocking summit with Putin caps off Trump’s turbulent Europe trip GOP lambasts Trump over performance in Helsinki Trump stuns the world at Putin summit MORE dismissed the first GOP-sanctioned debate Thursday before ripping into the Republican presidential field over voting rights.

During an interview on the Rev. Al Sharpton's radio program, Clinton said she doubted the Republican candidates competing in two groups later in the day would broach voting rights.

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“I don’t think I need to watch it to know that nearly everybody standing on that stage in the first or second debate has either actively sought to limit the right to vote in their state or supported the efforts to limit the right to vote," Clinton said.
"I expect them all to give lip service to the idea that has been disproved repeatedly, but which they use to justify their partisan goals — namely [that] there is this massive amount of voter fraud going on," Clinton said. 
 
The top 10 Republican presidential candidates based on recent national polling will take to the stage for a prime-time debate Thursday. An earlier debate will feature the remaining seven major candidates.
 
During the Sharpton interview, which aired on the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Voting Rights Act, Clinton touted her call for automatic voter registration and longer voting times. She also exuded confidence about her ability to lock up the Democratic presidential nomination.
 
Also Thursday, the party announced a limited Democratic debate schedule, provoking pushback from some candidates who accused officials of attempting to help Clinton.
 
"I can tell you, whoever I sit across from in the debates in the general election, I will be raising this, because this is such a fundamental constitutional right," Clinton said of voting rights issues.
 
"The best way to repudiate this, in addition to the lawsuits and the efforts we need to undertake — and when I'm president, appoint Supreme Court justices who care more about protecting an individual's right to vote than a billionaire's right to buy an election — is for people to turn out and vote," Clinton said.