Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulTrump’s attacks stun Republican senators Overnight Tech: Trump touts new Wisconsin electronics plant | Lawmakers to unveil email privacy bill | Facebook funds group fighting election hacks Bare-bones repeal plan gains steam in Senate MORE (R-Ky.) says that when it comes to foreign policy, Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioMexican politicians have a new piñata: Donald Trump Bush ethics lawyer: Congress must tell Trump not to fire Mueller The private alternative to the National Flood Insurance Program  MORE (R-Fla.), a fellow GOP presidential candidate, and Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonFusion GPS: White House trying to smear us on Russia OPINION | Gen. Hayden: How the Russians played the Trumps Book on Bannon getting made into TV series MORE are “the same person.”

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“I see her and Rubio as being the same person,” Paul said Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “They both want a no-fly zone. They both have supported activity in Libya, the war in Libya that toppled [Libyan Prime Minister Moammar] Gadhafi, an intervention that made us less safe.

“They both have supported the Iraq War, so, I mean, what’s the difference?” he asked.

He said Clinton is the candidate for president most likely to start a new war and described her as a “neoconservative.”

The Kentucky senator also took a shot at former Vice President Dick Cheney, who has been critical of Paul’s foreign policy.

“Yeah, well you know, Dick Cheney has been wrong about most of the foreign policy over the last several decades,” Paul said. “The last time he was right was when he warned the first George Bush that it would be a mistake to topple [former Iraqi President Saddam] Hussein because you’d have chaos and instability and you’d destabilize the region, which is exactly what happened after the Iraq War.”

Paul pointed to a poll that shows Republicans are in favor of decreasing U.S. involvement in foreign wars.

He also said Rubio will not be able to outrun the immigration-reform bill that he briefly supported in the Senate.

“He was a coauthor of the bill, I mean, it was a Rubio bill, it was a Rubio-[Charles] Schumer bill, so he will have to explain it,” he said. “I think it will be a big part of things.”