Poll: Trump presidency would embarrass half of Americans
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Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDems flip Wisconsin state Senate seat Sessions: 'We should be like Canada' in how we take in immigrants GOP rep: 'Sheet metal and garbage' everywhere in Haiti MORE maintains his lead among the GOP field, but half of Americans would be embarrassed to have the real estate mogul as president, a new poll found.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday shows Trump leading his next nearest opponent, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWith religious liberty memo, Trump made America free to be faithful again Interstate compacts aren't the right way to fix occupational licensing laws Texas Dem: ‘I don’t know what to believe’ about what Trump wants for wall MORE (R-Texas) at 28 to 24 percent, but the Republican presidential front-runner trails behind both major Democratic hopefuls in the general election.

While half of all polled would be embarrassed to have Trump as president, the majority of that sentiment comes from Democrats and independent voters.

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For Republicans, 44 percent would be proud to have Trump in the White House, twice as much as GOP voters who would be embarrassed. Only 4 percent of Democrats and 20 percent of independents would be proud to having Trump be president.

The poll also shows that only 41 percent of those polled think he has a "good chance" of beating the Democratic nominee, though again, the attitudes run along party lines: Among Republicans, 70 percent think he has a good chance; among Democrats, 14 percent think he stands a good chance, while Trump fares better among independents, 40 percent of whom think he can beat the Democratic nominee.

“Half of American voters say they’d be embarrassed to have Donald Trump as their Commander in Chief and most Americans think he doesn’t have a good chance in November, but there he is still at the top of the Republican heap,” Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll, said in a release.

Following Trump and Cruz among the Republican candidates are Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector Senators unveil bipartisan push to deter future election interference Puerto Rico's children need recovery funds MORE (R-Fla.), lagging behind in third place with 12 percent, and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, who received 10 percent. None of the remaining candidates registers above 6 percent.

Among voters of all parties polled, 59 percent think Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIntel Dem decries White House 'gag order' after Bannon testimony 'Total free-for-all' as Bannon clashes with Intel members Mellman: On Political Authenticity (Part 2) MORE has a good chance of beating the Republican nominee, with a majority of Democrats and independents believing that, while 36 percent of Republicans polled agree.

But it won't be easy for her, the poll finds. In hypothetical general election match-ups, Clinton topples Trump, 47 to 40 percent, while narrowly edging out Rubio by 1 point and tying Cruz. Her Democratic rival, Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersMellman: On Political Authenticity (Part 2) Former Sanders campaign manager: Don't expect email list to be shared with DNC Adult film star: Trump and Stormy Daniels invited me to 'hang out' MORE (I-Vt.), also defeats Trump, 51 to 38 percent, but falls short to both Rubio by 3 points and Cruz by 1.

“Hillary Clinton tops him," Malloy said of Trump. "Sen. Bernie Sanders hammers him and Sen. Ted Cruz is snapping at his heels. Can a candidate that half the American electorate thinks is an embarrassment win in November?” 

On the Democratic side, Clinton easily leads Sanders, 61 to 30 percent, with former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley in a distant third with 2 percent. 

The poll was conducted from Dec. 16 to Dec. 20 and surveyed 1,140 registered voters via landline and cellphone. The margin of error was 2.9 percentage points. In the breakdown, the poll surveyed 508 GOP voters with a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points, and 462 Democratic voters with a margin of error of 4.6 percentage points.