House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiFeehery: March Madness Without ranked voting, Pennsylvania's slim margins hide voters' preferences Dem leaders pull back from hard-line immigration demand MORE (D-Calif.) said Tuesday that Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonCourt questions greens’ challenge to EPA chemical rule delay The only way out of this mess Federal court tosses out Obama-era rule requiring financial advisers to act in customers' best interests MORE’s past should not be part the 2016 presidential race, adding that the focus should not be on what the former president "did two decades ago." 

“It would be if he were running for president but he isn’t,” she told MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell when asked if Clinton’s past affairs and allegations of sexual misconduct were fair game.

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump adds to legal team after attacks on Mueller Press: You can’t believe a word he says Feehery: March Madness MORE is running for president,” Pelosi said. "I believe that Hillary Clinton wants to talk about the issues that affect people and their everyday life. That’s what this election should be about, not what Bill Clinton did two decades ago.”

Pelosi argued that Hillary Clinton could drown out GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpLieu: There will be 'widespread civil unrest' if Trump fires Mueller Attorneys for Trump, Mueller hold face-to-face meeting to discuss potential interview topics: report Trump tariffs not helpful for nuclear talks, South Korea says MORE’s attacks on her husband by focusing on the economy instead.

“I think you stick with what is important to the American people and what’s important to the American people is their financial stability,” she said.

“That is what elections are about. That is why I say it’s a race between trickle-down economics [and] tax breaks for special interests and the very wealthy…or recognizing we’re a consumer economy and [it is] the success of the middle class. Consumer confidence is what is going to grow our economy.”

Hillary Clinton refused to comment Monday evening on Trump’s repeated attacks on her spouse’s indiscretions.

“People can say whatever they want about us – we understand that if you don’t have anything positive to say what you’ll do to help people’s lives, you’ll have to resort to personal attacks,” she said at Iowa’s Brown and Black Presidential Forum.

Trump has frequently dredged up past allegations of sexual harassment against Bill Clinton, arguing the former president became “fair game” once he began campaigning for Hillary Clinton.