GOP ’16 hopefuls pan Obama’s address
© Associated Press

Republican presidential candidates gave unsurprisingly negative reviews to President Obama’s final State of the Union address.

GOP front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpKoch-backed group launches six-figure ad buy against Heitkamp Anti-abortion Dem wins primary fight Lipinski holds slim lead in tough Illinois primary fight MORE panned the speech on Twitter as “really boring, slow, lethargic – very hard to watch.”

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush also tweeted his responses during the speech, bashing Obama for not taking foreign police threats, including from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria and North Korea, seriously.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz says Cambridge Analytica assured him its practices were legal Dem battling Cruz in Texas: ‘I can understand how people think this is crazy’ Overnight Tech: Facebook faces crisis over Cambridge Analytica data | Lawmakers demand answers | What to watch for next | Day one of AT&T's merger trial | Self-driving Uber car kills pedestrian MORE (R-Texas) struck Obama’s performance as “less of a state of the union than a state of denial,” as he hammered the president for refusing to use the words “radical Islamic terror,” or reference the ongoing situation with Iran. Earlier on Tuesday, Iran seized two Navy vessels and 10 sailors who reportedly were found on Iranian waters.

“This speech, he didn’t say a word about the Paris terror attacks, he didn’t say a word about San Bernardino,” Cruz said in an interview on NBC moments after the GOP response to Obama’s address.

“The American people are tired of having a president who won’t acknowledge the evil we are facing.”

Florida Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRubio: McCabe 'should've been allowed to finish through the weekend' For Tillerson, bucking Trump became a job-killer At least six dead after pedestrian bridge collapses on cars in Florida MORE stayed quiet on Twitter during the speech and didn't immediately issue a statement. But he needled the president in an interview with CNN ahead of the speech for leaving behind the America people and making the past seven years "disastrous."

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who, as a former congressman and current governor, regularly frames himself as the most qualified to hold the office, chided Obama’s administration as the failure of “on-the-job training” in his campaign statement.

Former Hewlett Packard executive Carly Fiorina, who consistently decries the political class, framed Obama’s speech as politics as usual in her statement and said it underscored the need for a political outsider as president.

Ben CarsonBenjamin (Ben) Solomon CarsonBen Carson suggests wife made decision to purchase ,000 dining set The Hill's 12:30 Report Cost of Pruitt's Italy trip rises above ,000 MORE, another political outsider, echoed that point on Twitter, when he called the remarks “the perfect example of why we must reform Washington DC and give the power back to We the People.”

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump formally sends Pompeo nomination to Senate Spending bill delay raises risk of partial government shutdown support Overnight Defense: Senate sides with Trump on military role in Yemen | Dem vets push for new war authorization on Iraq anniversary | General says time isn't 'right' for space corps MORE (R-Ky.) attacked the president in a YouTube video as a “leader with a record of failure in search of any meaningful positive legacy,” adding that he'd be the only candidate who could stop the "unholy alliance between the left and right."

Half of the senators running for president chose to attend the speech, while the other half skipped it. Rubio and Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is running for the Democratic nomination, were in attendance, while Cruz and Paul were not. Cruz stayed in New Hampshire to campaign; Paul’s staff told The Hill that he was in New York before leaving to campaign in Iowa and New Hampshire.