Republican presidential candidate Rand PaulRand PaulHealthcare fight pits Trump against Club for Growth GOP rep: Trump could be 'one-term president' if healthcare bill passes Overnight Defense: Pentagon chief urges Congress to approve budget boost | Senate fight over NATO addition MORE blasted GOP front-runner Donald TrumpDonald TrumpLondon mayor: 'I’m not going to respond to a tweet from Donald Trump Jr.' Congress, Trump need a united front to face down Iran Perez, Ellison start multistate ‘turnaround tour’ for Dems MORE early Sunday after the real estate mogul said he could “stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot people” and not lose voters.

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“Where to start?” Paul asked on CNN’s “New Day.” “I think, sometimes, narcissists have delusions. And I think he’s almost to the point of being delusional about his own power.”

“There’s a distinct American tradition that I represent that says too much power gravitating into the hands of anyone is a mistake — Republican or Democrat,” Paul added. “So we believe in a presidency limited by the Constitution. I think that Donald Trump believes in no limits to power as long as it’s coming to him. That’s very, very worrisome to us.”

The Kentucky senator said conservatives should be “alarmed” by Trump’s candidacy.

“I think he’s pulling the wool over our eyes, and we’ll be very sorry that he’ll be the consummate dealmaker, and he’ll be worse than anything we’ve got in Washington.”

In the same interview, Paul said he may benefit if former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg enters the 2016 race

“I think it’s showing some of the weakness of some of the front-runners, and it may be good for some of the candidacies like myself,” Paul said. “I think Bloomberg sees [Democratic front-runner Hillary] Clinton on one side and the possibility of criminal charges. And on the other side he sees a bombastic Trump that alienates large segments of the population, Hispanics, women, etcetera.”

“I think, really, it also is an opportunity for some of us that are underdogs,” he added. “And one of the interesting things is that we think the polls are wildly inaccurate.”

Paul said he thinks pollsters are underestimating his support from college students and young voters.