A top adviser to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonState Dept: Russia’s allegations about American citizens ‘absolutely absurd’ Trump on possible sit-down with Mueller: 'I've always wanted to do an interview' Election Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas MORE is accusing Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersElection Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas House Dems launching Medicare for All Caucus Let's remove the legal shield from hackers who rob us of our civil rights MORE of running the “most negative” Democratic primary campaign in history.

“I think, in fact, he’s probably running the most negative campaign of any Democratic presidential candidate … in a presidential primary season, yes,” said Joel Benenson, Clinton’s senior campaign strategist.

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“He’s running fundamental attacks and he’s going out on the stump and raising issues about her personally and her character and [that] of other Democrats as well,” he continued on CNN.

“I think he’s kind of ‘feeling the Bern’ as he’s getting more scrutiny,” Benenson added, mocking a slogan used by supporters of the Vermont senator.

“It seems like once you’re not with him, you become a vocal point of his attacks. I do think it’s been extremely negative and I think it’s unfortunate.”

Benenson, formerly a top pollster to President Obama, said he doesn't recall the 2008 race being as contentious.

“I was on [President] Obama’s side then,” he said. "I don’t think we had the range of negativity on either side.”

Sanders has repeatedly vowed his campaign would reject personal attacks.

He is sharpening his criticism of Clinton, however, as he runs close with the Democratic front-runner in crucial early voting states.

Clinton leads Sanders by only 2.5 points in Iowa before its first-in-the-nation caucuses on Monday. He has a solid lead in New Hampshire, holding a 14-point lead over Clinton in the state.

The former first lady has the edge nationwide, however. Clinton has a nearly 15-point lead over Sanders across the country, according to the latest RealClearPolitics average of polls.