Defiant Clinton vows: 'We will fight for every vote in every state'

A defiant Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonSanders press secretary leaves campaign RNC strategizes against Clinton VP contenders Analysis: Trump, Clinton plans not in line with balancing national debt MORE on Tuesday vowed to “fight for every vote” as she conceded the New Hampshire primary to Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders press secretary leaves campaign RNC strategizes against Clinton VP contenders Dems celebrate anniversary of gay marriage ruling MORE.

"I want to say, I still love New Hampshire and I always will," Clinton said to cheers.

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"Now, we take this campaign to the entire country. We will fight for every vote in every state."

News outlets called the race for Sanders immediately after last round of polls closed at 8 p.m., delivering a decisive win to the Independent senator.

Exit polls show that Sanders won with overwhelming support from young voters, something Clinton addressed during her speech. 

"I know I have some work to do, particularly with young people, but I will repeat again what I said this week," she said. 

"Even if they are not supporting me now, I support them, because I know I've had a blessed life, but I also know what it is like to stumble and fall."

Clinton emphasized that she and Sanders agree on issues such as campaign finance and Wall Street reform. But she said the election is about who can be a better "change maker" and portrayed herself as a having a more personal stake in the issue of money in politics. 

"Let's remember, Citizen's United, one of the worst Supreme Court decisions in our country's history, was actually a case about a right-wing attack on me and my campaign," she said.

"A right-wing organization took aim at me and ended up damaging our entire economy. So yes, you are not going to fund anybody more committed to aggressive campaign finance reform than me." 

Clinton stood on stage alongside her husband, former President Bill ClintonBill ClintonPoll: Voters divided on role of government in gun control Trump details '50 facts' attacking Clinton Clinton slams Trump on immigration in Arizona op-ed MORE, and daughter Chelsea. The crowd at the Clinton event appeared energized, cheering and clapping at a number of her applause lines despite her loss.

The Clinton campaign immediately conceded to Sanders in a memo released as the polls closed in New Hampshire and sought to shift the focus to the next two contests in South Carolina and Nevada. Both are more diverse states where Clinton is riding high thanks to her strong polling with minority voters. 

In her concession speech, Clinton made repeated references to her work to help minorities, including her social work before she ever ran for office and her recent trip to shed light on the water-treatment disaster in Flint, Mich., which is majority African-American.

After rattling off several broad economic issues, the centerpiece of Sanders's campaign, Clinton said "that is not enough." 

"We also have to break through the barriers of bigotry," she said to cheers. 

"African-American parents shouldn't have to worry that their children will be harassed, humiliated and even shot because of the color of their skin. Immigrant families shouldn't have to lie awake at night listening for a knock on the door."

This story was updated at 9:46 p.m.

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