Sanders beats Clinton in Facebook likes by 3-1 margin
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If Facebook likes were votes, Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersHannity snaps back at 'Crybaby' Todd: 'Only conservatives have to disclose relationships?' Chuck Todd lashes out at Fox, defends wife in radio interview Trump pressed Sessions to fire FBI agents who sent anti-Trump texts: report MORE would be on track to beat Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPaltry wage gains, rising deficits two key tax reform concerns Trump pressed Sessions to fire FBI agents who sent anti-Trump texts: report DNC sues Russia, Trump campaign and WikiLeaks over alleged election interference MORE by a margin of 3 to 1, according to a new interactive map that tracks Facebook likes.

Sanders gets 23 percent of the likes of all candidates, according to the data collected by the social media company, published in association with FiveThirtyEight.

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That compares to just 8 percent for Clinton.

Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpIG investigating Comey memos over classified information: report Overnight Defense: Congress poised for busy week on nominations, defense bill | Trump to deliver Naval Academy commencement speech | Trump administration appeals decision to block suspected combatant's transfer Top Pruitt aid requested backdate to resignation letter: report MORE tops likes for Republicans, and gets 23 percent of all likes in the country.

That’s well ahead of Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz's Dem challenger slams Time piece praising Trump Race for Republican Speaker rare chance to unify party for election 32 male senators back Senate women's calls to change harassment rules MORE (R-Texas), who comes in with 8 percent.

The data isn’t necessarily indicative of who the most popular candidates are in the country.

Facebook users are disproportionally younger than the overall population, and tend to be low-income and female.

But the data does give a glimpse into the massive support of young voters both Sanders and Trump have been garnering.

“The data isn’t predictive of the election, but it is a revealing look at the preferences of many people who use Facebook and like the candidates’ pages,” said managing editor David Firestone.