SC exit poll: 75 percent agree with Trump’s Muslim ban
© Greg Nash

Three-fourths of Republicans participating in Saturday’s South Carolina GOP primary say they support presidential hopeful Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAccuser says Trump should be afraid of the truth Woman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Shulkin says he has White House approval to root out 'subversion' at VA MORE’s proposal to ban all Muslims from entering the U.S., according to an exit poll. 

A CBS News exit poll of Palmetto State primary voters found that 75 percent said they support Trump’s proposal, while 23 percent said they oppose it.

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Just days after the terrorist attack in San Bernardino, Calif. – the worst on U.S. soil since 9/11 – Trump sparked a media backlash for saying that all Muslims should be temporarily banned from entering the country.

The proposal has been ridiculed as impossible to implement and called racist by some, but it has resonated with many people concerned about the potential for terrorists to infiltrate the U.S.

Terrorism was the top concern of GOP voters polled in the CBS survey, followed closely by jobs and the economy and government spending.

The real estate tycoon is the favorite to win the South Carolina primary on Saturday, although Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day HHS official put on leave amid probe into social media posts Trump, Pence to address CPAC this week MORE and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioColbert: Students taking action on gun violence 'give me hope' Lawmakers feel pressure on guns Florida lawmaker's aide fired after claiming shooting survivors were 'actors' MORE both appear to have made late gains.

The CBS exit poll also found that voters were split on supporting an outsider versus an establishment candidate, with 48 percent saying they want someone with no political experience against 46 percent who say they prefer an insider.