Clinton leaves Nevada with expanded delegate lead over Sanders
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Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonOPINION | Hey Dems, Russia won't define 2018, so why not fix your party's problems instead? Russian lawyer who met Trump Jr. represented spy agency: report Poll: Most say Trump Jr. should not have met with Russian lawyer MORE expanded her delegate lead over Bernie SandersBernie SandersOPINION | Hey Dems, Russia won't define 2018, so why not fix your party's problems instead? OPINION | They told us to abandon ObamaCare — then came the resistance OPINION | Shailene Woodley: US should run on renewable energy by 2050 MORE with her win in Saturday's Nevada caucuses.

With 96 percent of the state's precincts reporting, Clinton has netted 19 delegates, while Sanders has won 15. The remaining pledged delegate in the state will be awarded when the remaining results are counted. The state has 35 pledged delegates.

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Clinton also came into Saturday’s contest with support from three of the eight superdelegates from Nevada, compared to one for Sanders. The superdelegates can back any candidate at the Democratic convention.

The victory by Clinton in the caucuses will likely put her in a virtual tie for Sanders when it comes to pledged delegates won in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada.

But Clinton holds a major lead in total delegates thanks to a resounding lead in superdelegates. She has the support of about 449 superdelegates, compared to 20 for Sanders, according to some estimates. 

The former secretary of State’s superdelegate support similarly allowed her to walk away from New Hampshire with more total delegates than Sanders, despite his 20-point win in that primary.

Democratic superdelegates are free to change their minds at any point before they cast their final vote, so it’s possible that they could defect to Sanders if he continues to perform well. But the current numbers suggest that the majority of superdelegates are Clinton's to lose, giving her a significant leg-up in the nominating contest.

--This report was updated on Feb. 21 at 7:14 a.m.