Top Minnesota newspaper endorses Clinton
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Minnesota’s largest newspaper endorsed former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonManafort agrees to speak with investigators after subpoena: report Manafort heads for Senate showdown after subpoena Dem campaign arm slams Heller, Flake on healthcare votes MORE for president, adding to the Democratic candidate’s momentum after an overwhelming win in South Carolina’s primary on Saturday. 

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“We believe Clinton is the clear choice over Sanders for heart and head alike,” the Star Tribune editorial board wrote

The editorial board cited Clinton’s “fight to overhaul health care” to show she is “capable of setting big, visionary goals and tackling complex policy.” 

“Clinton also has repeatedly shown the patience and discipline to work with opponents on compromises that result in degrees of progress,” the editorial continued. 

In contrast, the editorial board called Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocrats, so focused on Russia, risk pushing Trump to war with Iran Why 'Lying Donald' Trump can't stop slandering Hillary Clinton New Dem message doesn’t mention Trump MORE (I-Vt.) a “polarizing” figure who “has fallen short on just how he would accomplish his political revolution.” 

Clinton, however, “proposes changes that are less sexy but more realistic.” 

The editorial board added that Clinton is the candidate who can “breach the divide between Democrats and Republicans” because she “has done so throughout her career.” 

The paper endorsed Clinton’s rival Barack ObamaBarack ObamaTrump considers naming Yellen or Cohn to lead the Fed West Wing to empty out for August construction Ex-CIA chief: Trump’s Boy Scout speech felt like ‘third world authoritarian's youth rally’ MORE in 2008. 

Minnesota is among the states heading to polls on Super Tuesday, March 1. While Clinton delivered her victory speech in South Carolina, Sanders was arriving in Minnesota to start his campaign there. A Star Tribune poll from January put Clinton with 59 percent of the Democratic vote to Sanders's 25 percent.