Farrakhan praises Trump for rejecting ‘Jewish’ money

Getty Images

Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan said he admires GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald TrumpWhy Clinton went for the kill Trump proposes consolidating trade policymaking offices NC GOP on Trump: Election results aren't optional MORE for avoiding the influence of Jewish special interests.

“[Trump] is the only member who has stood in front of [the] Jewish community and said, ‘I don’t want your money,’” Farrakhan said on Monday during the Nation's annual Saviours’ Day sermon, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

“Anytime a man can say to those who control the politics of America, ‘I don’t want your money,’ that means you can’t control me. And they cannot afford to give up control of the presidents of the United States.”

Farrakhan stopped short of endorsing the outspoken billionaire’s presidential campaign, however.

“Not that I’m for Mr. Trump, but I like what I’m looking at,” he told listeners at the Nation's Mosque Maryam in Chicago.

Farrakhan also accused Jews of collaborating with the American government and instigating the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“They needed another Pearl Harbor,” he said. "They needed some event that was cataclysmic, that would make the American people rise up, ready for war. They plotted a false flag operation and when a government is so rotten that they will kill innocent people to accomplish a political objective, you are not dealing with a human.

“Now, they got into the Bush administration and on 9/11 the Twin Towers went down. [Former President George W. Bush] and those devils, those Satans around him. They plotted 9/11. Ain’t no Muslim took control of that plane.”

Farrakhan’s kind words for Trump’s campaign follow his criticism of the outspoken billionaire last January.

“If Donald Trump becomes president, he will take America into the abyss of Hell,” he said on his Facebook page on Jan. 1.

“[Trump] is exacerbating the race situation in America. Mr. Trump is tearing away the skin of the onion of white civility, and the more he pulls the skin of that onion back, he’s beginning to show something in the character of whites that follow him, that they don’t care what he says," he added.