Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea GOP state lawmakers meet to plan possible constitutional convention MORE poured cold water on the calls to stop GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Trump Jr. declines further Secret Service protection: report Report: Mueller warned Manafort to expect an indictment MORE during a brokered convention, warning that there could be hell to pay with the grass roots if they believe their will is being disregarded.  

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"Any time you hear someone talking about a brokered convention, it is the Washington establishment in a fevered frenzy, they are really frustrated because all their chosen candidates, their golden children, the voters keep rejecting," Cruz said Friday at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC).
 
"So they seize on this plan of a brokered convention, and the D.C. power brokers will drop someone in who is exactly to the liking of the Washington establishment. If that would happen, we would have a manifest revolt on our hands all across this country."
 
In Cruz's mind, there's one way to beat Donald Trump: "with the voters."
 
With Trump leading the GOP race after a strong Super Tuesday, many Republicans are clamoring about the potential of splitting the field to prevent Trump from coming into the convention with a majority of delegates.
 
That could force delegates electing the nominee at the party's national convention to take a second vote, when most are no longer bound to a particular candidate.
 
The enthusiasm was stoked by a surprise speech by 2012 nominee Mitt Romney, who bashed Trump as a danger to the party and outlined a potential pathway to forcing the contested convention. 
 
"If the other candidates can find common ground, I believe we can nominate a person who can win the general election and who will represent the values and policies of conservatism," Romney said. 
 
"Given the current delegate selection process, this means that I would vote for Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Senate passes 0B defense bill Trump bets base will stick with him on immigration MORE in Florida, for John Kasich in Ohio, and for Ted Cruz or whichever one of the other two contenders has the best chance of beating Mr. Trump in a given state."
 
While Cruz said he wasn't yet on board with the idea of a contested convention, he told the CPAC audience that Romney's remarks reflect the concerns of a majority of Republicans.