Sanders: GOP debates sound like '6th-grade food fight'
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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie SandersBernie SandersSunday shows preview: Trump sits down with Fox Democrats: Where the hell are You? Sanders on Trump pick: This is how a rigged economy works MORE mocked Republican White House hopefuls Saturday for sounding like a bunch of sixth-graders at their recent debate in Detroit.

Sanders told MLive and The Grand Rapids Free Press, two Michigan publications, on Saturday that the GOP primary is falling to new depths of immaturity.

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"They really do sound like sixth-grade food fights, where amazingly enough adults in their 50s and 60s are throwing food at each other and cursing at each other and making fun of each other and insulting each other," the Vermont senator said in an interview reported by MLive.com.

The last Republican debate was especially raucous. GOP front-runner Donald TrumpDonald TrumpRepublican wins La. Senate runoff in final 2016 race Corker calls Tillerson 'very impressive' The other face of immigration from Mexico is African MORE taunted Marco RubioMarco RubioSenate clears water bill with Flint aid, drought relief What Trump's Cabinet picks reveal House passes water bill with Flint aid, drought relief MORE and Ted CruzTed CruzSenate passes dozens of bills on way out of town Senate passes stopgap funding bill, averting shutdown Senate advances funding measure, avoiding shutdown MORE as "Little Marco" and "Lying Ted."

Rubio recently implied that Trump had wet himself before a debate and made insinuations about the size of his hands.

The billionaire at Thursday's debate insisted he is well-endowed — rounding out a new low point in modern political decorum. 

"I think that is not what the American people want. The American people know we have some serious problems and they want to hear some serious solutions to those problems, not vicious personal attacks," Sanders said Saturday.

Michigan has 147 delegates at stake on Tuesday on the Democratic side.

Sanders attended a rally Friday in Grand Valley. 

He has repeatedly told supporters he has a good chance of beating Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonTrump must not pull a bait-and-switch on American workers Jewish groups divided over Hanukkah party at Trump hotel Colo. AG: Electoral College lawsuit could cause 'chaos' MORE as long as Democratic voters turn out in high numbers in the primaries and caucuses.

He lags Clinton by 634 delegates, but much of the gap is due to her commanding lead among superdelegates, who are not bound to vote for the former first lady at the party's convention. She has 458 party officials in her column compared to Sanders’s 22.

Sanders emphasized to the Michigan publications his difference with the former secretary of State over trade.

"Secretary Clinton and I have very profound differences," he said, according to MLive. "I was on picket lines with union members in opposition to NAFTA. I knew then it would be a disaster for American workers.

"These trade agreements have cost us millions of good-paying jobs all over this country, and the Midwest, Detroit, Illinois, Ohio have been especially hard-hit with these disastrous trade agreements. I have vigorously opposed them. Hillary Clinton has supported them. I stood up to corporate America. She worked with corporate America," he added.

Sanders has also stressed the need to crack down on Wall Street firms, which traditionally have supported Clinton, who formerly represented the financial services industry as the junior senator from New York.

Income inequality and the need to expand Social Security have been two other go-to issues for Sanders.