Romney: I'm not a tool for the establishment
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Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney said Sunday he didn’t offer his critique of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDems win from coast to coast Falwell after Gillespie loss: 'DC should annex' Northern Virginia Dems see gains in Virginia's House of Delegates MORE as a tool of the Republican establishment.
 
"Establishment suggests that there must be some 'Wizard of Oz' somewhere pulling the strings. That's not the way it works,” he said on "Fox News Sunday."
 
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"There are individuals like myself, I sat there and watched Donald Trump, and I said, 'Look, someone’s got to say something.’ I didn’t talk to anybody — say, 'I’m going to do a speech, you got some ideas?' This is something I did on my own because I care very deeply about the country."
 
Last week, Romney offered a rebuke of Trump as a charlatan with a string of failed business ventures behind him.
 
“He inherited his business, he didn't create it,” said Romney. “And what ever happened to Trump Airlines? How about Trump University? And then there's Trump Magazine and Trump Vodka and Trump Steaks, and Trump Mortgage? A business genius he is not.”
 
That’s led some observers to say Romney is simply defending the interests of established Republicans in Washington and donors around the country. But the former Massachusetts governor said on Sunday that is disproved by the fact that two of the candidates he says he could back — Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Finance: GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few no votes | Highlights from day two of markup | House votes to overturn joint-employer rule | Senate panel approves North Korean banking sanctions GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few ready to vote against it Anti-gay marriage county clerk Kim Davis to seek reelection in Kentucky MORE (R-Texas) and Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Cybersecurity: What we learned from Carter Page's House Intel testimony | House to mark up foreign intel reform law | FBI can't access Texas shooter's phone | Sessions to testify at hearing amid Russia scrutiny Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday This week: GOP seeks to advance tax overhaul MORE (R-Fla.) — have some level of anti-establishment credentials.
 
"Well, you can’t control Ted Cruz, for instance. No one has suggested you can do that,” he said. "And Marco Rubio, everybody tried to stop Marco Rubio from going against a sitting Republican governor in Florida. He did it anyway, and won."