Presidential candidates remember Nancy Reagan
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"Nancy Reagan, the wife of a truly great President, was an amazing woman,” Trump tweeted. "She will be missed!"
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"Nancy Reagan will be remembered for her deep passion for this nation and love for her husband, Ronald,” said Cruz, also on Twitter. "The Reagan family is in our prayers."
Nancy Reagan died on Sunday from congestive heart failure, according to a spokesperson.
 
"For conservatives, she has been a powerful living link to her husband's legacy as one of the greatest modern presidents," Florida Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioSenators introduce new Iran sanctions Senate intel panel has not seen Nunes surveillance documents: lawmakers With no emerging leaders, no clear message, Democrats flounder MORE (R) said in a statement.
 
 
On the Democratic side, the Clinton campaign released a statement.
 
"Nancy was an extraordinary woman: a gracious First Lady, proud mother, and devoted wife to President Reagan—her Ronnie. Her strength of character was legendary, particularly when tested by the attempted assassination of the President, and throughout his battle with Alzheimer's," said former President Bill ClintonBill ClintonWe must act now and pass the American Health Care Act Trump's message: Russia First or America First? Senate Democrats should grill Judge Gorsuch on antitrust. Here's how. MORE and Hillary Clinton in a statement. "She leaves a remarkable legacy of good that includes her tireless advocacy for Alzheimer’s research and the Foster Grandparent Program."
 
Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersStunning polls show Sanders soaring while 'TrumpCare' crashes The Hill's 12:30 Report The Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee MORE (I-Vt.), perhaps the most liberal candidate in the race, said Nancy Reagan's death was a moment beyond partisan politics.

"No matter your party or political ideology, this is a sad day for America," he said.
 
Reagan was an important partner as her husband rose from screen acting through the political ranks, eventually serving as first lady through both of his terms.
 
She is remembered, in part, for her “Just Say No” campaign against drug use. But she also advised Ronald Reagan on other matters, such as how to respond to the Iran-Contra scandal, and spoke out about surgery she received for breast cancer so that others might get mammograms.

In her later years, she advocated for Alzheimer’s research after her husband announced he had the disease.