Presidential candidates remember Nancy Reagan
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"Nancy Reagan, the wife of a truly great President, was an amazing woman,” Trump tweeted. "She will be missed!"
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"Nancy Reagan will be remembered for her deep passion for this nation and love for her husband, Ronald,” said Cruz, also on Twitter. "The Reagan family is in our prayers."
Nancy Reagan died on Sunday from congestive heart failure, according to a spokesperson.
 
"For conservatives, she has been a powerful living link to her husband's legacy as one of the greatest modern presidents," Florida Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioColbert: Students taking action on gun violence 'give me hope' Lawmakers feel pressure on guns Florida lawmaker's aide fired after claiming shooting survivors were 'actors' MORE (R) said in a statement.
 
 
On the Democratic side, the Clinton campaign released a statement.
 
"Nancy was an extraordinary woman: a gracious First Lady, proud mother, and devoted wife to President Reagan—her Ronnie. Her strength of character was legendary, particularly when tested by the attempted assassination of the President, and throughout his battle with Alzheimer's," said former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonShould the Rob Porter outcome set the standard? Make the compromise: Ending chain migration is a small price to legalize Dreamers Assessing Trump's impeachment odds through a historic lens MORE and Hillary Clinton in a statement. "She leaves a remarkable legacy of good that includes her tireless advocacy for Alzheimer’s research and the Foster Grandparent Program."
 
Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states After Florida school shooting, vows for change but no clear path forward MORE (I-Vt.), perhaps the most liberal candidate in the race, said Nancy Reagan's death was a moment beyond partisan politics.

"No matter your party or political ideology, this is a sad day for America," he said.
 
Reagan was an important partner as her husband rose from screen acting through the political ranks, eventually serving as first lady through both of his terms.
 
She is remembered, in part, for her “Just Say No” campaign against drug use. But she also advised Ronald Reagan on other matters, such as how to respond to the Iran-Contra scandal, and spoke out about surgery she received for breast cancer so that others might get mammograms.

In her later years, she advocated for Alzheimer’s research after her husband announced he had the disease.