A spokeswoman for GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Dems add five candidates to ‘Red to Blue’ program White House notifies Russia that no new sanctions are coming: report Senators push HHS to negotiate lower prices on opioid overdose reversal drug MORE on Monday suggested the phrase “bringing a knife to a gun fight” promotes bloodshed.

“If we want to talk about inciting violence, where is the interview when [Democratic presidential front-runner] Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHouse Dems add five candidates to ‘Red to Blue’ program Pompeo can lead the fight against global hunger and malnutrition Poll: Cruz running neck and neck with Dem challenger MORE and [President] Barack ObamaBarack Hussein Obama Stormy Daniels’s 'View' is incorrect Trump attorneys defend Obama’s Atlantic Ocean protections Don’t let Washington’s toxic partisanship infect foreign policy, too MORE when they’re talking about ‘bringing a gun to a knife fight?’” Trump spokeswoman Katrina Pierson asked host Jake Tapper on CNN’s “The Lead."

"Obama invoked the phrase 'bringing a knife to a gun fight' during his 2008 presidential campaign against Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump's NASA nominee advances after floor drama Senate repeals auto-loan guidance in precedent-shattering vote Overnight Defense: Lawmakers worry over Syria strategy | Trump's base critical of strikes | Flake undecided on Pompeo | Coast Guard plans to keep allowing transgender members | GOP chair wants to cut B from Pentagon agencies MORE (R-Ariz.), that year's Republican nominee.

"If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun," he said of countering GOP attacks against him during a fundraiser in Philadelphia in June 2008.  "Because from what I understand, folks in Philly like a good brawl.  I've seen Eagles fans."
 
Pierson also criticized rhetoric from Democrats for inciting violence against police.
 
"Today, we have police officers called out to fake calls so that they can be ambushed and potentially assassinated," she said.

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Tapper tried to contradict Pierson’s definition of “bringing a knife to a gun fight” by citing “The Untouchables,” a 1987 mobster movie starring Sean Connery that uses the colloquialism.

He argued that the phrase — typically used to denote entering into a situation unprepared — has a different meaning that Pierson claims.

“I didn’t recognize that, absolutely not,” she responded when Tapper mentioned his assessment based on the film.

“Well, you should check out the film ‘The Untouchables,’” Tapper countered.

Trump cancelled a rally in Chicago last Friday night amid fears that it could provoke widespread violence between protesters and his supporters.

Several of his campaign events have since featured physical conflict between his fans and detractors, with police making multiple arrests across the country.

Trump on Monday denied his public appearances are beset by heated conflicts, arguing that his events have had “no violence” overall. Critics argue that the billionaire’s bombastic rhetoric and hardline policies on issues like immigration are making voter frustrations boil over nationwide.