A spokeswoman for GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald TrumpDem rep: Trump can't deliver on promise because of Russia probe Trump turns up heat on AG Sessions over recusal Trump: 'I won't say' that I should be on Mount Rushmore MORE on Monday suggested the phrase “bringing a knife to a gun fight” promotes bloodshed.

“If we want to talk about inciting violence, where is the interview when [Democratic presidential front-runner] Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonTrump turns up heat on AG Sessions over recusal Mellman: Trump love? Overnight Cybersecurity: Senate Judiciary reportedly drops Manafort subpoena | Kushner meets with House Intel | House passes Russia sanctions deal | What to watch at 'hacker summer camp' MORE and [President] Barack ObamaBarack ObamaTrump considers naming Yellen or Cohn to lead the Fed West Wing to empty out for August construction Ex-CIA chief: Trump’s Boy Scout speech felt like ‘third world authoritarian's youth rally’ MORE when they’re talking about ‘bringing a gun to a knife fight?’” Trump spokeswoman Katrina Pierson asked host Jake Tapper on CNN’s “The Lead."

"Obama invoked the phrase 'bringing a knife to a gun fight' during his 2008 presidential campaign against Sen. John McCainJohn McCainMcCain votes to advance ObamaCare repeal, replace after vowing to oppose Overnight Defense: House passes Russia sanctions deal | McCain returns to Senate | Watchdog opens criminal probe into M camo mistake Tough road ahead for McConnell on ObamaCare MORE (R-Ariz.), that year's Republican nominee.

"If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun," he said of countering GOP attacks against him during a fundraiser in Philadelphia in June 2008.  "Because from what I understand, folks in Philly like a good brawl.  I've seen Eagles fans."
 
Pierson also criticized rhetoric from Democrats for inciting violence against police.
 
"Today, we have police officers called out to fake calls so that they can be ambushed and potentially assassinated," she said.

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Tapper tried to contradict Pierson’s definition of “bringing a knife to a gun fight” by citing “The Untouchables,” a 1987 mobster movie starring Sean Connery that uses the colloquialism.

He argued that the phrase — typically used to denote entering into a situation unprepared — has a different meaning that Pierson claims.

“I didn’t recognize that, absolutely not,” she responded when Tapper mentioned his assessment based on the film.

“Well, you should check out the film ‘The Untouchables,’” Tapper countered.

Trump cancelled a rally in Chicago last Friday night amid fears that it could provoke widespread violence between protesters and his supporters.

Several of his campaign events have since featured physical conflict between his fans and detractors, with police making multiple arrests across the country.

Trump on Monday denied his public appearances are beset by heated conflicts, arguing that his events have had “no violence” overall. Critics argue that the billionaire’s bombastic rhetoric and hardline policies on issues like immigration are making voter frustrations boil over nationwide.