Senate Dems tie vulnerable Republicans to Trump in new ad
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The campaign arm of Senate Democrats launched its first paid advertisement Tuesday, aiming to tie vulnerable Republican incumbents and upstart Senate challengers to GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpFamily immigration detention centers could be at capacity within days: report Trump likely to meet with Putin in July: report DOJ requests military lawyers to help prosecute immigration crimes: report MORE.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) ad intersperses clips of some of Trump’s incendiary remarks — with a lot of foul language bleeped out — with clips of incumbents and House members running for Senate saying they’ll support Trump if he’s the party’s nominee.

Among those who make an appearance: Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump's America fights back Mellman: Trump can fix it GOP strategist Steve Schmidt denounces party, will vote for Democrats MORE (Ariz.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenate moving ahead with border bill, despite Trump 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families Lawmakers, businesses await guidance on tax law MORE (Ohio), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteErnst, Fischer to square off for leadership post The Hill's Morning Report: Koch Network re-evaluating midterm strategy amid frustrations with GOP Audit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars MORE (N.H.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrHillicon Valley: New FTC chief eyes shake up of tech regulation | Lawmakers target Google, Huawei partnership | Microsoft employees voice anger over ICE contract On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Senators hammers Ross on Trump tariffs | EU levies tariffs on US goods | Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending Senate Intel requests more testimony from Comey, McCabe MORE (N.C.), Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThis week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill Trump attending Senate GOP lunch Tuesday High stakes as Trump heads to Hill MORE (Ill.), Pat Toomey (Pa.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border Ernst, Fischer to square off for leadership post Facebook gives 500 pages of answers to lawmakers' data privacy questions MORE (Mo.), and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonSenate probes FBI's heavy-handed use of redactions to obstruct congressional investigators Hillicon Valley: DHS gets new cyber chief | White House warns lawmakers not to block ZTE deal | White nationalists find home on Google Plus | Comcast outbids Disney for Fox | Anticipation builds for report on FBI Clinton probe Graham jokes about Corker: GOP would have to be organized to be a cult MORE (Wis.).

Portman, Ayotte, Kirk, Toomey and Johnson all face tough reelection prospects in a presidential year, when turnout could favor Democrats. Kirk and Johnson are the most endangered of the bunch, while Portman, Ayotte and Toomey are running in hotly contested swing states.

Also in the ad are Reps. Joe Heck (Nev.), who is running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAmendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP Donald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary MORE (D-Nev.), and David Jolly (Fla.) and Ron DeSantis (Fla.), who are in a crowded primary running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate moving ahead with border bill, despite Trump Hillicon Valley: New FTC chief eyes shake up of tech regulation | Lawmakers target Google, Huawei partnership | Microsoft employees voice anger over ICE contract Lawmakers urge Google to drop partnership with Chinese phone maker Huawei MORE (Fla.).

“Republicans running for U.S. Senate, running with Trump,” text from the ad states.

It then cuts to Trump saying: “What the hell are we doing?”

“Exactly,” the ad concludes.

The DSCC says the ad is the first in what will be a “sustained campaign” across television, radio and social media meant to tie Republicans running for Senate to the controversial GOP front-runner.

Democrats have a good chance of taking back the Senate in 2016 after losing their majority in the last cycle.

Republicans are defending 24 seats, compared to only 10 for Democrats. If Democrats net five seats, they’ll win back the Senate.

Many Republicans up for reelection are running in states President Obama carried in 2008 or 2012.