Senate Dems tie vulnerable Republicans to Trump in new ad
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The campaign arm of Senate Democrats launched its first paid advertisement Tuesday, aiming to tie vulnerable Republican incumbents and upstart Senate challengers to GOP presidential front-runner Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAccuser says Trump should be afraid of the truth Woman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Shulkin says he has White House approval to root out 'subversion' at VA MORE.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) ad intersperses clips of some of Trump’s incendiary remarks — with a lot of foul language bleeped out — with clips of incumbents and House members running for Senate saying they’ll support Trump if he’s the party’s nominee.

Among those who make an appearance: Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (Ariz.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanCommittee chairman aims for House vote on opioid bills by Memorial Day Flake to try to force vote on DACA stopgap plan Congress punts fight over Dreamers to March MORE (Ohio), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteAudit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars US sends A-10 squadron to Afghanistan for first time in three years No, the US did not spend million on a gas station in Afghanistan MORE (N.H.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Finance: Senate rejects Trump immigration plan | U.S. Bancorp to pay 0M in fines for lacking money laundering protections | Cryptocurrency market overcharges users | Prudential fights to loosen oversight Senators introduce bill to help businesses with trade complaints Our intelligence chiefs just want to tell the truth about national security MORE (N.C.), Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (Ill.), Pat Toomey (Pa.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntRussian assault on 'American idea' enables Trump to take tough action Eleven lawmakers have used campaign funds to pay NRA dues: report Kimmel writer tweets amount NRA has given lawmakers in response to shooting prayers MORE (Mo.), and Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonTrump spars with GOP lawmakers on steel tariffs Overnight Regulation: Trump unveils budget | Sharp cuts proposed for EPA, HHS | Trump aims to speed environmental reviews | Officials propose repealing most of methane leak rule Trump budget seeks savings through ObamaCare repeal MORE (Wis.).

Portman, Ayotte, Kirk, Toomey and Johnson all face tough reelection prospects in a presidential year, when turnout could favor Democrats. Kirk and Johnson are the most endangered of the bunch, while Portman, Ayotte and Toomey are running in hotly contested swing states.

Also in the ad are Reps. Joe Heck (Nev.), who is running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidWATCH: There is no Trump-Russia collusion and the media should stop pushing this The demise of debate in Congress ‘North by Northwest,’ the Carter Page remake MORE (D-Nev.), and David Jolly (Fla.) and Ron DeSantis (Fla.), who are in a crowded primary running for the seat being vacated by Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioColbert: Students taking action on gun violence 'give me hope' Lawmakers feel pressure on guns Florida lawmaker's aide fired after claiming shooting survivors were 'actors' MORE (Fla.).

“Republicans running for U.S. Senate, running with Trump,” text from the ad states.

It then cuts to Trump saying: “What the hell are we doing?”

“Exactly,” the ad concludes.

The DSCC says the ad is the first in what will be a “sustained campaign” across television, radio and social media meant to tie Republicans running for Senate to the controversial GOP front-runner.

Democrats have a good chance of taking back the Senate in 2016 after losing their majority in the last cycle.

Republicans are defending 24 seats, compared to only 10 for Democrats. If Democrats net five seats, they’ll win back the Senate.

Many Republicans up for reelection are running in states President Obama carried in 2008 or 2012.